Federalism, Finance, and Social Legislation in Canada, Australia, and the United States

By A. H. Birch | Go to book overview

7
SOCIAL LEGISLATION IN CANADA

I. SOCIAL LEGISLATION BEFORE 1930

IN Canada, as in the United States, there was little social legislation before 1930. The social backgrounds of the two countries were essentially similar; both were dominated by the existence of unexploited western territories and the consequent emphasis upon mobility and expansion, and it was this factor that held back the demand for social security. There were, however, one or two differences of background which must be mentioned. The first of these is the existence of the French-Canadians in Quebec, amounting to approximately a third of the total population at the time of confederation. This has meant that social attitudes in the Province of Quebec have been dominated by the ideas of the Roman Catholic Church and many activities which are elsewhere the responsibility of the state are there left to private organization. It may be noted in passing that the French proportion of the total population has remained remarkably stable; a lower rate of immigration has been balanced by a higher birth-rate, and in 1941 the proportion was 30 per cent.

The second important difference is that the Canadian colonies, unlike the American ones, did not all take over from Britain the principles of the Elizabethan poor law. Nova Scotia and New Brunswick did so, but Upper and Lower Canada did not. That Lower Canada, which was predominantly French, should not have adopted these principles is only to be expected, but the case of Upper Canada is less straightforward. Until 1791 this area was included in the French-speaking colony of Quebec, but during and after the American Revolution large numbers of loyalists migrated thereto, and by the Constitutional Act of 1791 the colony of Upper Canada was split off and given representative institutions and British civil law. During the next forty-nine years the colony could have adopted the principle of local responsibility for the care of the poor,

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Federalism, Finance, and Social Legislation in Canada, Australia, and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.