Nonmetropolitan America in Transition

By Amos H. Hawley; Sara Mills Mazie | Go to book overview

Figures
1.1 Typology of Recent Nonmetropolitan Population Change32
1.2 Nonmetropolitan Counties with High Percentage of Older Population, 197636
1.3 Concentration of Nonmetropolitan Racial Minorities, 197038
1.4 Nonmetropolitan Low-Income Counties42
1.5 Principal Industry of Employment in Nonmetropolitan Counties, 197044
7.1 Nonmetropolitan Passenger Transportation in 1962, 1967, and 1972257
13.1 Median Income of Mexican-Origin Families by Metropolitan/Nonmetropolitan Residence, 1973 and 1976531
14.1 Interacting Elements That Determine Housing Cost564
14.2 Association Between House Age and Value and Household Income for Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Areas by Region, 1977570
14.3 Relationship Between Household Income and Household Size in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Areas, 1976571
14.4 Housing Market Equilibriums in Small and Large Communities586
15.1 Conventional and Alternative Water Technology Cost Functions596
15.2 Demand and Costs of a Public Service599
15.3 Public Service Average Cost Curve605
15.4 One Sector of a Nonmetropolitan Development Model606
16.1 Nonfederal Physicians per 100,000 Population by County, from Most Urban (9) to Most Rural (1), 1970623
16.2 Geographic Distribution of 22,925 U.S. Medical School Graduates and Foreign Medical Graduates Licensed Between 1967 and 1971, by Specialty Groups628
21.1 Economic Development Regions776
21.2 Regional Water Resources Planning Entities780
21.3 Economic Development Districts786

-xiii-

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