Nonmetropolitan America in Transition

By Amos H. Hawley; Sara Mills Mazie | Go to book overview

3
Local Perspectives on Community Growth

INTRODUCTION

There is growing evidence of a unique trend in population redistribution in the United States. For most of the post- World War II era, interest in migration focused on a massive movement of residence and workplace from major urban centers to peripheral suburban areas ( Farley 1976; Hawley 1972; Kasarda 1978; Zimmer 1975). In the more recent past, the decline of population in the urbanized regions of the United States (i.e., particularly the Northeast and North Central States) and the considerable movement of people and commerce to the South and West has been of increasing concern ( Alonso 1971; Perry and Watkins 1977; Morrison 1977c). By the mid- 1970s, attention shifted to an unprecedented resurgence of nonmetro population growth ( Beale 1975; Berry 1976; McCarthy and Morrison 1978). The extent, meaning, and causes of this population turnaround are more fully explored elsewhere.

The purpose of this chapter is to present evidence that complements and expands knowledge about the social consequences of nonmetro growth. This topic draws upon sociological theories about the rural to urban transformation of communities in modern society, and in particular the effects of this growth upon individuals' actions and attitudes within their localities. The most common research method for determining the existence of what is described later as a more "urban way of life" is the ecological approach, which contrasts aggregate rates of community or individuals' characteristics with demographic change in the locality. Historical (or longitudinal) and comparative designs can be employed in these types of analyses. Although some information of this sort is reviewed here, as well as case-study data, major attention is devoted to the social impact as-

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nonmetropolitan America in Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 838

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.