A New Handbook of Political Science

By Robert E. Goodin; Hans-Dieter Klingemann | Go to book overview

Foreword

THE International Political Science Association is proud to have contributed to the making of the New Handbook of Political Science. Participants in the IPSA XVI World Congress in Berlin in 1994 had an opportunity to hear initial presentations of many of the chapters in a series of sessions, organized by the Editors, on "'The State of the Discipline'".

This is an appropriate time at which to take stock of political science. The discipline faces new challenges in understanding and assessing recent dramatic, sometimes tragic, world events and sweeping political changes. The New Handbook covers familiar, staple topics in political science, such as political institutions, political behavior, public policy and political theory, but the political context, in North as well as South, East as well as West, is no longer so familiar. New questions are being asked about such fundamentals as the nation state and sovereignty, and there is growing interest in the politics of religion, ethnicity and varieties of pluralism.

Intellectual developments, too, during the last twenty years have brought a wide range of new theoretical frameworks and methodologies into political science. Some scholars, for example, now use highly technical and sophisticated mathematical models, others have moved under the philosophical umbrella called post-modernism, many are proponents of the 'new institutionalism', and feminism is a major presence.

Political science is also changing in other ways. As part of the current wave of democratization, the discipline is being established or strengthened in many countries, and now exists more widely than ever before. The numbers of women and younger scholars from around the world participating in the IPSA World Congress, and the fact that the Congress was addressed by the Association's first woman President, reflected the democratization that has been taking place within political science itself.

The New Handbook provides an unusually comprehensive and systematic discussion of all the major areas of the discipline. In this era of specialization, practitioners and their students will turn to contributions beyond

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A New Handbook of Political Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 846

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.