A New Handbook of Political Science

By Robert E. Goodin; Hans-Dieter Klingemann | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THE New Handbook of Political Science has its origins in a set of panels we organized on the "state of the discipline" for the XVIth World Congress of the International Political Science Association, which met in Berlin in August 1994. Some contributors were unable to come at the last minute; others who came have fallen by the wayside, for one reason or another, in the course of transforming the Congress papers into a coherent book. But most of the contributors to this volume had the invaluable opportunity to discuss their draft chapters with one another, and with others from adjacent subdisciplines, in Berlin. It is a much more unified and cohesive book than it would otherwise have been.

We want to take this opportunity to thank the many people who made those meetings possible--most particularly our secretaries and assistants, Norma Chin, Frances Redrup, and Judith Sellars in Canberra, and Gudrun Mouna and Hubertus Buchstein in Berlin. We should also take this opportunity to pay tribute to the larger IPSA organization--including most especially the then President, Carole Pateman; the then Secretary-General, Francesco Kjellberg, and his able assistant, Lise Fog; and the Local Organizer of the Berlin Congress, Gerhard Göhler.

We should also thank the many people who have offered valuable advice on the substance of the New Handbook, ranging from suggestions on the selection of topics and contributors to detailed comments on the substance of particular chapters. First and foremost, once again, are the members of the IPSA Program Committee--most particularly Carole Pateman, Jean Leca, Ted Lowi, and Luigi Graziano. Among the many others who have been invaluable sources of excellent advice, the contributions which particularly stand out are those of John Dryzek, John Uhr, Barry Weingast, and members of Research Unit III at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin.

We ought to pay more than the usual passing tribute to our publishers. Tim Barton and Dominic Byatt have been constant sources of advice and assistance, encouragement and admonitions. Putting together a high-

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