Thus the contradiction between the subjection of women from West Africa to the harsh deprivations of slavery, farm, factory, and domestic work and the sense of autonomy and self-reliance which developed, points in the direction of a new avenue for studying black American women. And it is the potential synthesis of these contradictions which embraces the future problems and possibilities of a new definition of femininity for all American women.


Notes
1.
See Delores Aldridge, "'Black Women in the Economic Marketplace: A Battle Unfinished'", Journal of Social and Behavioral Scientists, 21 (Winter 1975): 48-61; Jacqueline Jackson, "'Family Organization and Ideology'", in Kent Miller and Ralph Dreger (eds.), Comparative Studies of Blacks and Whites in the United States ( New York: Seminar Press, 1973); and Diane K. Lewis, "'A Response to Inequality: Black Women, Racism, and Sexism'", Signs, 3 ( Winter 1977): 339-61.
2.
Natalie J. Sokoloff, "'The Economic Position of Women in the Family'", in Peter J. Stein , Judith Richman, and Natalie Hannon (eds.), The Family (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 1977).
3.
E. Franklin Frazier, The Negro Family in the United States ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1966).
4.
Herbert Gutman, "'Persistent Myths about the Afro-American Family'", Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 6/2 ( Autumn 1975).
5.
US Department of Labor, Office of Policy Planning and Research, The Negro Family: The Case for National Action ( Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, March 1965).
6.
Herbert Gutman, The Black Family in Slavery and Freedom ( New York: Pantheon Books, 1976).
7.
These findings were quoted in Clarence Turner, "'Some Theoretical and Conceptual Considerations for Black Family Studies'", Blacklines, 2 ( Winter 1972): 16. The assumption that slavery was a closed system (item no. 5) without any influences from outside the plantation or from traditional African life has been hotly debated. Two people who have presented findings to the contrary are Melville Herskovitz ( The Myth of the Negro Past ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1941)) and John Blassingame ( The Slave Community ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1972)). In general, revisionist history seeks to examine the existence and influence of African survivals in Afro-American culture.
8.
Andrew Billingsley, Black Families in White America ( Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968).
9.
Charles Valentine, "'Deficit, Difference and Bicultural Models of Afro- American Behavior'", Harvard Educational Review, 4½ ( May 1971).
10.
Joyce A. Ladner, Tomorrow's Tomorrow ( Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1971).
12.
William Ryan, Blaming the Victim ( New York: Vintage, 1971), 7-8.
13.
Warren Ten Houten, "'The Black Family: Myth and Reality'", in Arlene Skolnick and Jerome Skolnick (eds.), The Family in Transition ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1971), 420.

-46-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminism and History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 614

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.