The Foundations of American Citizenship: Liberalism, the Constitution, and Civic Virtue

By Richard C. Sinopoli | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, "Discourse on the Sciences and Arts (First Discourse)", in The First and Second Discourses, trans. Roger D. Masters and Judith R. Masters, ed. Roger D. Masters ( New York: St. Martin's Press, 1964), p. 59.
2
As a matter of terminological shorthand, I sometimes refer to the people engaged in the constitutional framing and ratification controversies simply as the "constitutional founders". Clearly, the founding encompasses a much broader time frame and variety of thought than I cover in this book and I do not intend to treat the writers I discuss as representative of the whole.
3
Quoted in Don Herzog, "Some Questions for Republicans", Political Theory 14 ( August 1986): 483.
4
The phrase is Gordon Wood. See his The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787. ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1969), p. 428. Robert Dahl's A Preface to Democratic Theory ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1956) is a classic example of a work focusing on the role of governmental and social checks and balances in promoting political stability to the exclusion of civic dispositions.
5
The main revisionist works discussing republican influence in early America include the following: Bernard Bailyn, The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, Belknap Press, 1967); idem, The Origins of American Politics ( New York: Vintage Books, 1968); Lance Banning, "Jeffersonian Ideology Revisited: Liberal and Classical Ideas in the New American Republic", William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 43 ( January 1986): 3-19; Drew McCoy , The Elusive Republic: Political Economy in Jeffersonian America ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1980); J. G. A. Pocock, "Between Gog and Magog: The Republican Thesis and the Ideologica Americana", Journal of the History of Ideas 48 ( April-June, 1987): 325-46; Pocock, The Machiavellian Moment ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1975); idem, "The Machiavellian Moment Revisited: A Study in History and Ideology", Journal of Modern History 53 ( March 1981): 49-72; Gerald Stourzh, Alexander Hamilton and the Idea of Republican Government ( Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1970); and Wood, The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787.

For a more comprehensive review and criticism of various aspects of the republican thesis, see, for example, Joyce Appleby, "Republicanism in Old and New Contexts", William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 43 ( January 1986): 20-34; James T. Kloppenburg, "Christianity, Republicanism, and Ethics in Early American Political Discourse", Journal of American History 74 ( June 1987): 9-33; Isaac Kramnick, "Republican Revisionism Revisited", American Historical Review 87 ( June 1982): 629-64; idem,

-179-

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