The Federal Republic in Spain: Pi Y Margall and the Federal Republican Movement, 1868-74

By C. A. M. Hennessy | Go to book overview

10
Cantonalism and the Collapse of the Republic, 1873-4

WHEN Pi fell from power no one mourned his passing. The Federal press had turned against him and while it admired his honesty it deplored his policy. Others thought that now he had been freed from the embarrassments of conciliation he would put himself at the head of the extremists, where it was felt he really belonged. In the Cortes, the Right feared the social implications of his policy; the Left had done their best to make it impossible for him to govern at all and the spokesmen of the Centre, Cala and Díaz Quintero, had demolished his hopes of drawing up a Constitution quickly by presenting an alternative draft. Many of those in the Centre who had voted for him in preference to Salmerón only did so out of personal loyalty, not because of sympathy with his policy.1 Once the cantonalist revolt had broadened, Salmerón was assured of their support although in drawing up his Ministry he had leaned almost exclusively on the Right. Maisonnave, Pi's bitterest critic in his Ministry, took over the Ministry of the Interior, Carvajal was retained in that of Finance, and González Iscar in that of War--in spite of his equivocal behaviour over the ordering of Velarde to march on Cartagena--Oreiro, an exRadical, took over the Ministry of Marine. The other Ministers, Soler y Pla, Fernández González, and Moreno Rodríguez, were all sympathetic to the Right. Only Palanca, Minister of Overseas, came from the Centre.

Within four days of Salmerón coming to power large and small towns from Castellón to Cádiz had declared themselves independent cantons. On 19 July Seville, Cádiz, Valencia, Almansa, and Torrevieja declared themselves independent cantons. On the 20th

____________________
1
La Igualdad, 19, 22, 23 July; La Discusión, 21 July 1873.

-220-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Federal Republic in Spain: Pi Y Margall and the Federal Republican Movement, 1868-74
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.