The Federal Republic in Spain: Pi Y Margall and the Federal Republican Movement, 1868-74

By C. A. M. Hennessy | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
The Political Ideas of Pi y Margall

THE kernel of Pi's ideas are to be found in La Reacción y la Revolución ( 1854) and in Las Nacionalidades ( 1876). Whereas the first was little more than an expanded political pamphlet, deliberately polemical and having a practical end in view, the latter work was better arranged, more cogently argued, and uncluttered by superficial learning. Nevertheless, there are few new ideas in the latter work, which is mainly an amplification of views which had been expressed but not developed in 1854. Then, Pi had been trying to put forward a theory to combat the idea of the 'sovreignty of the people' by which power was distributed qualitatively and to show how the laws of historical development made revolution inevitable and continuous; in 1876 he is concerned to show how precedents for federal organization may be traced throughout Spanish history. If federalism failed in Spain, he implies, it was not because it was misconceived but because these precedents were not fully known or appreciated. Although in the latter work he still saw the aim of political organization as the safeguarding of individual liberty, the emphasis has moved to the pueblo and the municipio as the basic social and political unit. The highly individualist and anarchist position he adopted in 1854 was not developed and was only revived by the Anarchists seeking a justification for their own action in the last years of the century.

In La Reacción y la Revolución Pi had two main aims in view--to popularize the idea of historical progress obeying rigid laws and to establish the principle of the sovereignty of the individual as a justification for universal suffrage and as the starting-point for a Democrat political theory. Pi sees two main principles at work in society--Liberty and what he calls 'Social Fatality'. Humanity is opposed to Man, both being subject to different laws. When we talk of Progress, he writes, we refer to institutions or the progress of Humanity, or the human race.1 The development of Humanity is subject to an historical law. This law he calls 'Social Fatality'. It has been explained in the Hegelian view of historical development. Fatality is the dramatic name Pi gives to Progress achieved through the working out of the Hegelian dialectic. He

____________________
1
La Reacción y la Revolución, p. 21.

-258-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Federal Republic in Spain: Pi Y Margall and the Federal Republican Movement, 1868-74
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.