The USA and the New Europe, 1945-1993

By Peter Duignan; L. H. Gann | Go to book overview

4
Germany: Key to a Continent

The 1989 revolutions in Eastern and Central Europe caused a seismic shift throughout Europe, and within two years thereafter the Soviet Union disintegrated. By contrast, the economic power of the European Community became even more overwhelming. By 1990 the "Europe of Twelve" consisted of some 320 million people and accounted for about one-third of the world's currency reserves. The EC, in other words, was the world's largest trading partner; its stake in global commerce exceeded the combined shares of the United States and the Soviet Union. (In 1984 the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries accounted for 44 percent of global commerce compared with 13 percent for the United States.) The ratio of trade to the gross domestic product rose steadily, and intra-European integration became ever more effective. Europewide companies expanded their business in manufacturing, retailing, finance, and transport. Whatever fears pessimists might harbor regarding a future "Fortress Europe," the EC as a whole had become dependent on the world economy and the EC's component national economies had become integrated with one another. 1 Within the EC and within the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Germany occupies a key position. Germany is the most powerful European partner in terms of conventional arms, the most populous state in Europe and the best armed after the Soviet Union, and the only country that forms a part both of Western Europe and of Central and Eastern Europe -- das Land der Mitte, the land between. It has not always been thus.


WEST GERMAN SUCCESS STORY

At the end of World War II, Germany lay prostrate and Britain still occupied the leading position within Western Europe. But from 1961

-90-

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The USA and the New Europe, 1945-1993
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2 - An Expanding Alliance 1945-1987 34
  • 3 - The Us and Its Main Partners: Informal and Formal Links 1949-1985 61
  • 4 - Germany: Key to a Continent 90
  • 5 - East-Central Europe: The Great Transformation 1985-1992 128
  • 6 - Embattled Empire: from Soviet Union to Cis 180
  • 7 - The Us and the New Europe 1985-1993 227
  • 8 - The Us: A Hopeful Future 276
  • Notes 319
  • Bibliography 342
  • Index 349
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