The USA and the New Europe, 1945-1993

By Peter Duignan; L. H. Gann | Go to book overview

7
The US and the New Europe 1985-1993

The 40 years which followed the collapse of Germany in 1945 saw greater political, economic and social change in Europe than any four-decade period in previous European history. In 1984 France's President Mitterand and West Germany's Chancellor Kohl called for a new European Union treaty. In the same year the EC and EFTA issued the Luxembourg Declaration in which they favored the creation of a single European economic area. At the end of World War II, such designs would have appeared Utopian. By the mid-1980s, however, Western Europe had become far more prosperous and united than ever before. Europeans, and also Americans, increasingly became alike in appearance and habits. It was not only superficial surface similarities -- rock music, freeways and filling stations, high-rise buildings, and advertising posters; there were more deep-seated similarities.

Above all, there were great demographic changes. In Western Europe, as in the US, the proportion of women in the labor force kept rising. As more women found paid employment in industry and services, and as occupational opportunities for women widened, family values changed. At the same time, the populations of the industrialized countries grew older. The relatively well-off Northerners were the first Europeans to have fewer babies; but from the 1980s Italians, Spaniards, Greeks, and Portuguese also joined the trend. (By 1991 Italian women, strikingly, had the lowest fertility rate in Europe.) 1 Feminism became a powerful political force, transnational in character. Older people also became an increasingly powerful lobby. (In the United States, the American Association of Retired Persons, a political action group speaking for the elderly, came to be regarded by politicians in Washington as even more fearsome than the gun lobby.) The elderly became more and more important as voters. Hence their political concerns became more influential -- their hostility to inflation,

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The USA and the New Europe, 1945-1993
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2 - An Expanding Alliance 1945-1987 34
  • 3 - The Us and Its Main Partners: Informal and Formal Links 1949-1985 61
  • 4 - Germany: Key to a Continent 90
  • 5 - East-Central Europe: The Great Transformation 1985-1992 128
  • 6 - Embattled Empire: from Soviet Union to Cis 180
  • 7 - The Us and the New Europe 1985-1993 227
  • 8 - The Us: A Hopeful Future 276
  • Notes 319
  • Bibliography 342
  • Index 349
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 358

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.