Elizabethan and Jacobean Studies

By Frank Percy Wilson | Go to book overview

Preface

THE authors of the studies collected in this volume are only too well aware that they represent a far larger group of pupils, friends, and colleagues all over the world who would wish to show their affection and gratitude to F. P. Wilson on his seventieth birthday. The editors believed, however, that the fittest tribute to him would be a volume of substantial essays, all concerned with one period, and on topics within that period which would represent the range of his interests. They were thus able to invite only a limited number of contributors, and many who would have wished to be included were debarred by the fact that their interests lay outside the period, or that they had no work in hand which would fit the general plan. This is then only a token volume in honour of a great Elizabethan scholar who, in the course of his years as first tutor and then Reader at Oxford, as Professor at Leeds, London, and Oxford, and in his frequent and extensive pilgrimages to seats and shrines of learning in the North American continent, has signally advanced our knowledge of Elizabethan and Jacobean literature. He has done this not only by his own published work but most notably also by the generous encouragement and help which he has given to others.

It is our hope that the author of Elizabethan and Jacobean, the General Editor of the Malone Society, the late President of the Bibliographical Society, and the Collector of Proverbs will find some pleasure in reading these essays, and will accept them with our grateful thanks and admiration. They are offered with all best wishes that his retirement from teaching duties will give him the leisure to crown a life devoted to literary scholarship with the book which only he can write on Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Drama.

Herbert Davis

Helen Gardner

-v-

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