Elizabethan and Jacobean Studies

By Frank Percy Wilson | Go to book overview

A Mirror for Magistrates Revisited
E. M. W. TILLYARD

I DO not intend to plead that, as poetry, the Mirror has been seriously misjudged, my main business being with its interest and not with its beauty. Nevertheless, thinking that it is rather better as poetry than the average of modern criticism allows, I will by way of preface point to a few places, usually, if not inveterately, ignored, which can give pleasure to the reader.

Miss Lily Campbell, whose editions I, of course, use and to whom every student of the Mirror is immeasurably indebted, calls John Dolman's solitary contribution (one of the 1563 additions) 'probably the worst poetry in the Mirror'.1 C. S. Lewis, on the other hand, while calling Dolman's Lord Hastings unsatisfactory and immature, finds it the most promising part of the collection. Dolman

understands better than any of his collaborators, better even than Sackville, what a poem ought to be. The other ghosts are mere mouthpieces of moral and political doctrine: but Dolman really tries by changes of mood and human inconsistencies to dramatize his Hastings. . . . The poem is confused, crowded, and uncomfortable. But it anticipates, in however dim a form, nearly every one of the excellences which were soon to be knocking at the door.2

In their ways both are right. Dolman can write very bad verse, crude and halting. But he has infused life into parts of his story. And I would go beyond Lewis in holding that he can achieve not only memorable lines but memorable passages. The most memorable is the passage describing Hastings's flight with his master, Edward IV, from Lynn and the sea voyage: the embarkation, the isolation on the ship at sea, the flight from enemy ships. Dolman is close to the real happening. This is his account of the passengers' plight at sea:

As banished wightes, such ioyes we mought have made,
Easd of aye thretnyng death, that late we dradde.

____________________
1
The Mirror for Magistrates, edited by Lily B. Campbell, 1938, p. 45.
2
English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, 1954, pp. 243-4. Maurice Evans, English Poetry in the Sixteenth Century, 1955, p. 123, also praises Dolman's contribution.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elizabethan and Jacobean Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 358

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.