Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII.
MAJOR NATHAN PARKER.

"Charge them, my brave boys!"

"Nor shall his glory be forgot
While Fame her record keeps;
Or Honor points the hallowed spot
Where Valor proudly sleeps."

ONE of the noblest duties of the living is to perpetuate the virtues and memories of the dead. In obedience to the impulse of this sacred sentiment, I now attempt to sketch a soldier whose attractive personality and superb martial bearing challenged the love and admiration of all men; a chieftain whose escutcheon was stainless as the robe of an angel in heaven; a cavalier whose every word and deed was absolutely beyond criticism -- Major Nathan Parker. I can employ no language eulogistic of this lovable officer that will not awaken a responsive echo in the heart of every man who served in the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry. While the soldiers admired the cool, brave, imperturbable Giltner, and enthusiastically sang pæans in praise of the dashing, indomitable Pryor, they loved Parker, who, calm, kind, modest and courteous, readily won the unswerving fealty of all his companions in arms.

Tall and erect, well proportioned, but not very strong, rather dark complexion, jet-black hair and beard, fascinating dark eyes, soft and kind in expression, Major Parker was not only an attractive personage, but he was lovable. He was invariably neatly attired, wearing the uniform of a Confederate major. A truer patriot or knightlier soldier never fought nor ever died. He fought for the Confederacy, and for the Confederacy he died. He was the "Stonewall" of his regiment; yea, of the brigade. A soldier of great fortitude, he never murmured at any hardship, nor hesitated to obey an order that would carry him into the jaws of death.

-58-

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