Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX.
PAST TENNESSEE CAMPAIGN--EVENTS OF 1863--TELFORD'S--LIME. STONE--CAPTURE OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH OHIO INFANTRY REGIMENT.

"Hark! hark! comrades, a Federal drum!
And see I invading squadrons come!"

THE most important events of the war, during the autumn of 1863, occurred in East Tennessee and Georgia--the battle of Chickamauga, the siege of Chattanooga, the decisive battle of Missionary Ridge, and Longstreet's desperate assault upon Fort Sanders, at Knoxville. From Chattanooga to the Virginia line was one vast battlefield, the fighting being fierce and continuous.

East Tennessee, noted for its adherence to the Union, is said to have had thirty-one thousand men in the Federal army, besides innumerable relentlessly cruel bushwhackers who infested the mountains.

Here was the home of Andrew Johnson, afterward President of the United States; of Horace Maynard, Parson Brownlow and Thomas A. R. Nelson, prominent Union leaders. Nelson was a noted lawyer, judge, orator and statesman, not of the venomous temperament that characterized the others, and was of counsel for Johnson in the celebrated impeachment trial. Nelson had a commodious residence, some distance east of Knoxville, which I frequently visited, and where I became acquainted with Mrs. Nelson and family, excepting, of course, her husband, who was never at home when we were in that vicinity. Mrs. Nelson was a plain, sensible, refined lady, whom I hold in grateful remembrance for liberal hospitality and gentle, considerate kindness shown me.

It was in this country that the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry made much of its fighting record.

-64-

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