Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII.
GENERAL RANSOM--GENERAL WM. E. JONES--GENERAL JOHN S. WILLIAMS--GENERAL. GEO. B. CRITTENDEN.

GENERAL RANSOM

WAS a North Carolinian and a "West Pointer;" a martinet and a strict disciplinarian, crabbed and imperious. He had a fine martial appearance, and--a fondness for persimmon beer. His curt, domineering manner, and the issuance of an order prohibiting officers and soldiers from entering the homes of citizens, uninvited, made him exceedingly unpopular. His idea was to treat volunteer troops the same as regulars.


GENERAL WM. E. JONES

Was an eccentric officer, who seemed to take pleasure in self-torture, as if doing penance.

At a point near Bristol, Tenn., I was sent to him with a message and found him lying on the ground, face downward, in a tent filled with smoke from a smoldering fire in the center. I involuntarily drew back. In muffled tones the general called to me: "Lie flat down and the smoke won't hurt you." I dropped upon my hands and knees, crawled to him and delivered the message--about as ludicrous and undignified a scene as one could well imagine.

General Jones had served with Stonewall Jackson, and rode a little, trotting clay-bank mare, to which he was much attached. He said the famous Stonewall had ridden the unpretentious-looking animal in the battles of Harpers Ferry, Sharpsburg and Second Manassas. He was a small man, beyond middle life, exceedingly plain in dress, brave to a fault, cool and imperturbable. He was killed, shot through the head while charging the enemy, hat in hand, at Piedmont, Va.

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