Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIX.
THE SECOND BATTLE AT CYNTHIANA -- ADESPERATE COMBAT-- THE CAPTURE OF GENERAL HOBSON--THE FATAL ENCAMPMENT ON THE WRONG SIDE OF LICKING RIVER.

"Hurrah! to the battle!
They form into line:
The swords, how they rattle!
The guns, how they shine!"

WHILE our men were scattered about the town, partaking of the hospitality of the citizens--generous, although their town was burning down--ColonelTrimble sent in a courier from Kellar's Bridge, announcing that he had met a strong force of Federals whom he was powerless to hold in check.

Giltner quickly withdrew his brigade from the town and double-quicked it to Trimble's support. The Fourth Kentucky, led by Colonel Pryor, went by way of the Fair Grounds, and the line of battle was soon formed--Chenoweth and Trimble on the right, Clay's battalion, commanded by Holliday, and Johnson's battalion, commanded by Jackson, in the center, and the Fourth Kentucky on the left--not more than five hundred and fifty men in all. It was then about 9 o'clock. The Federals, in gallant array, moved upon us, through open fields, their line about as long as ours, but with heavy reserves behind. It was a pretty cerulean picture, but we did not remain in our position to admire the imposing array of blue. With a yell our line charged and drove them back and down the slope to the bluffs of Licking River, where they reinforced their line and made a stubborn stand. The fighting was close and deadly, the enemy plainly outnumbering us two to one, possibly more. Their evolutions and steadiness under the galling fire of our unerring riflemen indicated that they were brave, disciplined troops, commanded by a gallant and trained officer.

The combat became most desperate. On the slope I saw Jesse Fallis, of the Fourth Kentucky, stretched on his back,

-154-

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