Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXX.
THE THIRD BATTLE AT CYNTHIANA--THE CONFEDERATES DEFEATED AND STAMPEDED--MANY CAPTURED--DEATH IN THE LICKING RIVER--NARROW ESCAPES OF GENERAL, MORGAN AND A REMNANT OF HIS COMMAND--THE CONFEDERATE FORCE, CUT IN TWAIN, RETREATS FROM THE STATIC BY TWO ROUTES--THE FEDERAL PRISONERS PAROLED--THE BUMMER--RESULTS OF THE RAID.

"On the low hills to the westward,
The consul fixed his eye;
And saw the swarthy storm of dust
Rise fast along the sky;
And nearer fast and nearer,
Doth the red whirlwind come;
And louder still and still more loud,
From underneath that rolling cloud,
Is heard the trumpet's war-note proud,
The trampling and the hum."

MEMORABLE Sunday morning-- June 12, 1864! The culmination of the Iliad of our tribulations. Amid the peaceful harmonies of nature on the Sabbath day, instead of church bell chimes we hear the war trumpet and the clangor of arms. We see the carpet of bluegrass sward and the waters of Licking River reddened by the blood of Kentuckians, fighting on and for their natal soil.

"Down they go, the brave young riders;
Horse and foot together fall;
Like the plowshare in its furrow
Through them plows the Northern ball."

Before the dawn of that Sunday morning I had been lying on the ground, soundly sleeping, immediately to the left of the turnpike, and was awakened by the rumble of artillery and the tramp of Federal cavalry. The ominous sound came rushing on, and at early dawn our weary cavalrymen were once more in battle line to contend with the fresh host so rapidly bearing down upon them.

Captain Warren Montfort hastened to awake General Morgan; , Johnson's and Jessee's battalions took positions on the

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