Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXV.
MISCELLANY.

GENERAL MARSHALL AND TOM HAYDEN.

ONE afternoon the Fourth Kentucky, being in advance, had halted after crossing a mountain, waiting for the rest of the brigade to "close up." General Marshall riding up from the rear stopped at the head of the regiment, where for the first time he saw Tom Hayden, the bugler. Now Tom had belonged to a brass band before the war, and when he went into the army he took his cornet horn along to keep in practice. He was an accomplished musician, and could play on almost any kind of instrument. Colonel Giltner knowing his accomplishments appointed him bugler. Tom neglected to learn the various regulation cavalry "calls," and usually, when sounding reveille, boots and saddles, etc., he would simply play some popular air, a favorite being "Sweet Ellen Bayne." The keys were frequently out of order, and often it was difficult to blow the bugle at all. General Marshall examined Tom's horn, and then pleasantly commanded him to sound the "calls." Tom, afraid to confess that he did not know them, said the old horn was out of order and could not be blown. The general then told him to whistle the "calls." Tom said he could not whistle. The general then laughingly said that "a bird that could sing and wouldn't sing should be made to sing," and then he rode away, much to Tom's relief.


GENERAL MARSHALL AND THE SABER DRILL

At one time, during Bragg's Kentucky campaign, we were hustled off to Morehead, Rowan County, to assist General John H. Morgan in intercepting the Federal general, George W. Morgan, then making his famous retreat from Cumberland Gap.

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