Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XLII.
IN THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY (Continued)--GENERAL EARLY MAKES A RECONNOISSANCE IN FORCE--THE INFANTRY EXCHANGES PLEASANTRIES WITH THE CAVALRY--LOST ON A BLEAK PLATEAU --A FRAGRANT BREATH AND TWO CANTEENS--A WEIRD SCENE.

"See you the foeman's banner waving?"
"We see the foeman's banner waving."
"Hark to the music--the trumpet and fife,
How they ring through the ranks which they rouse to the strife!"

FROM Front Royal we moved on down the valley, looking for Sheridan, whom we found about five miles south of Winchester. On the night of November 11, 1864, our bivouac fires illumined a line of battle, and three miles distant was a long line of glowing fires, indicating that "Cavalry Sheridan" was ready and willing to fight us on the morrow. Early's army had marched down the valley with "glad and gallant tread," seemingly eager to recover the laurels it had won and lost at Cedar Creek, October 19th.

The bands played inspiring melodies, and the veterans of many battlefields sang, jested and laughed, apparently without a thought of the probable horrors of a great battle on the morrow. Their hearts were filled with "banquet song and dance and wine," oblivious of the morrow's tear, the groan, the knell, the pall, the bier. Here and there, however, was a group of Kentucky cavalrymen speculating upon "coming events," and grimly discussing the probability of measuring lances with the "gallant yellow-haired Custer," who was known to be with the Federal cavalry in front.

When Tom Hayden's bugle sounded the reveille on the morning of November 12th, our division ( Lomax's) was on the extreme right of the army. An occasional volley was heard toward the front, and as usual "camp rumors" were numerous. Some said that Sheridan had fallen back beyond Winchester, and that Early's infantry skirmishers were already advancing; others said that Sheridan was moving

-220-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 283

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.