Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XLVIII.
THE CAPTAINS OF THE FOURT KENTUCKY CAVALRY.

CAPTAIN W. D. RAY,

AFTERWARD major of the regiment, commanded Company A until the death of Major Parker. He was a middle-aged man, of medium height, stout, ruddy complexion, genial temperament and naturally a military- looking man. His face was smooth-shaven, excepting a notably heavy mustache, which gave him a somewhat fierce expression. He had been a member of the Buckner Guards and was a brave, reliable officer.


CAPTAIN BEN DUNCAN,

Who had been first lieutenant of Company A, succeeded to the captaincy when Captain Ray was made major. He was a rather small man with a compact, sturdy frame, of sandy complexion, quiet but alert, pleasing in manner, cool and intrepid, witty, intelligent and one of the very best "all- round" officers in the regiment.


CAPTAIN JOHN G. SCOTT.

Slightly above medium height, slender, somewhat delicate in appearance, hair tinged with gray, voice rather strong, head carried high, graceful, dashing and one of the "bravest of the brave"--such was Captain Scott of Company B. He was affable in manner and one of the most popular officers in the command. He usually rode a gray horse, and when charging the enemy he had a habit of waving his hat above his head that had a most inspiring effect upon his own and other troopers. He was a model cavalry officer, his favorite tactics being to dash right at the enemy; and when such opportunity presented itself he went at them like a veritable thunderbolt of war, being as irresistible as Napoleon's

-243-

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