Social Relations and Morale in Small Groups

By Eric F. Gardner; George G. Thompson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIX
Out-Group Affiliations of Fraternity Members

The major hypotheses of the present study involve the relationship of indices of social relations and group-structure based upon the adequacy of the group's ability to satisfy its members' psychological needs and two aspects of morale. In addition to the specified major hypotheses, we are interested in examining the hypothesis that participation in extra- curricular (or out-group) activities is related to the effectiveness of the group in satisfying the many psychological needs of its members. The ability of a group to retain its members both physically and functionally has been described by such terms as "group cohesiveness," "holding power" and "morale."

There is reason to believe that the over-all social-relations status of a group may covary with the nature and number of its members' affiliations with other groups. For example, a fraternity whose membership cannot adequately satisfy the psychological needs of its members may find them transferring their energies from promoting the welfare of the fraternity to the support of other organized groups within the university community. This loss may take the form of members joining a larger number of other organizations or devoting sufficient time to other organizations to become leaders in them at the expense of the fraternity.

At Syracuse University there are many activities which compete for the student's time. In general it is considered

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