The Spirit and Purpose of Geography

By S. W. Wooldridge; W. Gordon East | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
THE NATURE AND DEVELOPMENT OF GEOGRAPHY

It is one of the glories of modern knowledge that the study of geography has been transformed. . . . The proper study of man's habitat is one of the triumphs of the rational spirit.

K. B. SMELLIE, Why We Read History ( 1947).

The Concise Oxford Dictionary declares soberly under "geography": "Science of the earth's surface, form, physical features, and political divisions, climate, productions, population, etc."

This definition is true without being either very helpful or illuminating to the serious student of the subject. Even this brief statement would make it appear that the scope of geography is distractingly wide and its aim far from clear. The form of this earth is strictly the concern of geodesy, its physical features are, in part at least, the concern of the geologist, and its climates the result of meteorological processes, the study of which is a branch of applied physics. No less does the explanation of its political divisions appear to fall to the historian, since they are the outcome of long-term human processes--migrations, wars, revolutions and the complex sequence of political and social change. "Production," it is true, is in one aspect an affair of geography, but it is also more especially the concern of economics. Similarly, although the distribution of population is plainly of geographical interest, much has been written on population and its problems which is outside both the interest and the competence of the geographer.

The only phrases in the dictionary definition on which we have made no comment are those which pre-empt for geography the "earth's surface" and its "natural divisions." It might well

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Spirit and Purpose of Geography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • List of Sketch Maps 9
  • Preface 11
  • Chapter I - The Nature and Development Of Geography 13
  • Chapter II - The Philosophy and Purpose Of Geography 25
  • Chapter III - Physical Geography And Biogeography 39
  • Chapter IV - Geography and Maps 64
  • Chapter V - Historical Geography 80
  • Chapter VI - Economic Geography 103
  • Chapter VII - Political Geography 121
  • Chapter VIII - Regional Geography and The Theory of Regions 140
  • Chapter IX - Conclusion 161
  • Note on Reading 167
  • Index 171
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.