CHAPTER XIII
POLITICAL HISTORY, 1874-1938

THE return of Adu Bofo to Kumasi after the death of Dompre and his bitter campaign in the Krepi country caused the centre of interest in the Sagrenti war to shift to the main Cape Coast-Kumasi road. The war in the east, however, was far from over, as poor Captain Glover found when he tried to raise a force from the eastern districts to advance on Kumasi.

Captain Glover had already begun his trans-Volta campaign against the Anlo when he received Sir Garnet's peremptory orders to march at once for the Pra and be ready to cross it on 15th January, 1874. He broke up his camp on 29th December, leaving Mr. Goldsworthy and Lieutenant Moore, R.N., with nearly 12,000 levies, to continue the Anlo campaign. Fighting went on with varying results for the next three months; the Anlo and the Akwamu fought hard, hoping to receive before long assistance from Ashanti. After the treaty of Fomena had been signed, however, Ashanti envoys arrived at Keta with the news that they could give the Anlo no more help and that the Anlo must make the best terms for themselves they could. In June a treaty was signed at Dzelukofe near Keta: the Volta was to be open to trade, and Keta, Dzelukofe and other towns on the coast were to become British territory on the same terms as the lands west of the Volta. The eastern frontier was extended to Adafia or Adafienu, eighteen miles east of Keta, and the whole Anlo country was thus brought under British rule. A similar peace treaty had been signed a week earlier with the Akwamu at Odumase.

In 1877 and 1878 there was serious trouble in the Keta district. Geraldo de Lema, having been forced to abandon the slave trade, had transferred his attention to smuggling, and being a man who always worked on the grand scale, had enlisted almost the whole Anlo people in his activities. The European traders had established stores at Denu, a mile outside the frontier, and landed goods there duty free. When buying produce at Keta they paid in orders on their Denu stores, and Geraldo de Lema's combine made a living

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