APPENDIX I
THE EUROPEAN FORTS ON THE GOLD COAST
Arranged in order from east to west; see map, page 92
1. Prinzenstein at Keta. Built by Danes 1784; besieged by the Anlo 1844, and rescued from starvation by the French warship Abeille. Bought by the British 1850.
2. Konigstein at Ada. Built by Danes 1784, bought by British 1850.
3. Friedensborg at Ningo. Built by Danes 1734, bought by British 1850.
4. Vernon at Prampram. Built by British about 1787, but soon abandoned.
5. Augustaborg at Teshi. Built by Danes 1787, bought by British 1850.
6. A small Portuguese fort stood near Accra during the first half of the sixteenth century; in 1578 it was taken and destroyed by the Accra.
7. Christiansborg at Osu near Accra. The site may have been occupied by the Portuguese from 1578 (after the loss of No. 6) till 1645. Castle built by Swedes 1657 and taken by Danes 1659. Sold to the Portuguese by the Danish second in command in 1679, and bought back from the Portuguese by the Danes three years later. Taken by Asameni and the Akwamu in 1693 and resold to the Danes next year. Bought by British 1850.
8. Crèvecœur at Accra. Built by Dutch 1650, taken by British in 1782, and restored to the Dutch three years later. The Dutch abandoned it for a short time in 1818, but afterwards reoccupied it. Ceded to the British in 1867, and renamed Ussher Fort.
9. James at Accra. Built by English in 1673; history uneventful.
10. For some time during the seventeenth century there was an English fort at Shido, but it was abandoned before 1700.
11. The Dutch built a fort at Beraku in 1667; it was taken by the

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