The Country of the Blind: The Soviet System of Mind Control

By George S. Counts; Nucia Lodge | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
THE PARTY OF LENIN AND STALIN

THE FREE WORLD must understand the source and controlling purposes of Soviet foreign policy and world outlook. For the building of mutual sympathy and an enduring peace, it should also know far more than it does about the history, the ethnology, and the geography, the music, the art, and the literature, the education, the science, and the technology, the economy, the government, and the whole social order of this vast country that excites the hopes and the fears of so many millions today throughout the earth. But from the standpoint of the immediate future condition of mankind it is Soviet foreign policy and world outlook that must be understood at this time. That such understanding is far from easy was recognized by Winston Churchill when he dramatically characterized Russian policy as a "riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma." But perhaps the problem is less difficult than he thought.

In seeking the key to this riddle one must turn first of all to the All-Union Communist Party of Bolsheviks, its origin, its history, its structure, its leadership, and its basic ideology. With its six million members, its Central Committee of seventy-two, its Politburo of fourteen, and its complex and far-flung apparatus it is the decisive political reality in the Soviet Union. Granted the power of the country, everything else dwindles into comparative insignificance. Under the popular designation of the "Party of Lenin and Stalin" it is officially hailed by the editor of Pravda as "the

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