The Country of the Blind: The Soviet System of Mind Control

By George S. Counts; Nucia Lodge | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
INTELLECTUALS AS SOLDIERS -- AT HOME

PERHAPS the reader need not be told again that Stalin said to H. G. Wells: "Education is a weapon whose effect depends on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed." Also perhaps he need not be told that all the arts and sciences, and all the agencies through which they are nurtured and practiced, are recognized as educational processes and institutions subject to state control. And finally perhaps he need not be told that the guiding of this vast apparatus for influencing and moulding the mind of the Soviet people is a jealously guarded monopoly of the central organs or high command of the All-Union Communist Party of Bolsheviks. Yet he who would understand the Soviet Union must ever keep these obvious and oft-repeated propositions clearly in mind.

If the arts and sciences are weapons, if education in each and all of its manifold organized forms is a weapon, then it follows that those who practice these arts and sciences and thus participate in the education of the Soviet people, and particularly in the education of the youth, are soldiers of Communism. They are reminded of this condition daily in almost every issue of Pravda or Izvestia, over every radio station, in books and pamphlets and journals, at the theatre and the cinema and on the athletic field. They are told without ceasing that they occupy a forward position in the current battle for the world, that they are fighting on the "ideological front" in the first`line of fire." If they believe what they hear, read, and behold, they must see themselves marching

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