The Country of the Blind: The Soviet System of Mind Control

By George S. Counts; Nucia Lodge | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TEN
IN THE PERSPECTIVES OF HISTORY

THE STORY unfolded in these pages adds little that is wholly novel to the human record. This veracious account of resolutions and decrees, of confessions and recantations, of cringing and grovelling, of flattery and sycophancy presents a picture as old as unmitigated tyranny. It should dispel the last illusion, still surviving from the hopes of 1917, that the Bolsheviks have brought anything new and inspiring to man's long search for freedom, justice, and truth. The promise of the Russian Revolution has been wrecked on the rocks of dictatorship and absolutism. The most pessimistic predictions made by Lenin's old comrade, Jules Martov, and other liberal leaders of the "October days" have been fulfilled to the last letter. These words of Peter Lavrov from his appeal to Russian revolutionary youth in 1874 seem to have been written in the light of the events and conditions reported in the foregoing pages: "Falsehood cannot be the means for the dissemination of truth, nor the authoritarian rule of a person the means for the realization of justice."

This is not to say that the Communists have contributed nothing toward perfecting the methods of tyranny and mind control. The contrary is probably the case. Rarely, if ever, has any despotism organized its system of rule with such cool calculation and on such a vast scale. The Soviet leaders have exhibited a measure of genius in the utilization for their purposes of those powerful engines for the moulding of the mind created by modern science and technology -- the press, the cinema, the radio, and all forms

-348-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Country of the Blind: The Soviet System of Mind Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 380

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.