Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics

By Hilda D. Oakeley | Go to book overview

ANAXIMANDER OF MILETUS

Said to have been born 610, and to have written his book about 546 B.C. The second Milesian Philosopher. He was a very bold and daring thinker, but although a moral element may be traced in the spirit of all the early Greek speculation, his philosophy is really concerned with the Nature of Things. The following fragment illustrates the notion of the limits which all things in nature, as in human existence, must observe, an idea pervading Greek thought.

The text from which the translation of this fragment and all those of Heraclitus, Philolaus and Democritus is made is that given in Diels' Fragmente der Vor-Sokratiker, and the reference to his numbering.

DIELS 9.

That from which all things derive their origin is also that to which they return, as their destruction, according to destiny. For they render justice and retribution to each other for their injustice, in conformity with the order of time.

Simplicius, from THEOPHPRASTUS.


HERACLITUS OF EPHESUS

Said to have "flourished" 504-501 B.C. Wrote in an obscure style, and was named "the dark." His sayings have a prophetic ring, and seem to contain germs of much of later thought. Those which have been selected illustrate especially the ideas of the common Word or Reason, and of harmony through discord.

DIELS 2.

(92.) Therefore ought we to follow wisdom, that is the common. For wisdom is the common. But though the Word is common, the multitude live as if they had an insight of their own.

-33-

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Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Contents xxxix
  • Greek Ethical Thought 1
  • Theognis - 565-490 B.C. 15
  • Simonides - 556-467 B.C. 17
  • Bacchylides - Probably 507-428 B.C. 18
  • Aeschylus - 525-456 B.C. 20
  • Sophocles - 495-406 B.C. 26
  • Euripides - 480-406 B.C. 29
  • Anaximander of Miletus 33
  • Philolaus - Fifth Century B.C. 33
  • Democritus of Abdera 36
  • Thucydides - 460-400 B.C. 39
  • Xenophon's "Memorabilia" 46
  • Plato - 427-347 B.C. 52
  • Aristotle - 384-322 B.C. 142
  • Epicurus - 342-270 B.C. 190
  • The Stoics - The First Heads of the Stoa 199
  • Epictetus - About A.D. 50 to A.D. 130 209
  • The Thoughts Of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus - Born A.D. 121. Emperor A.D. 161. Died A.D. 180 216
  • Index of Authors, Works, And Chief Ethical Subjects 223
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