Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics

By Hilda D. Oakeley | Go to book overview

PLATO
427-347 B.C.

Was born and died in Athens. He was a pupil of Socrates, 408-399 B.C., founded the Academy, 387-6 B.C., visited Sicily three times, and endeavoured without success to influence Dionysius II. ethically and politically.

Plato's moral philosophy is essentially bound up with his philosophy of the universe, although from many of his Dialogues a clear conception of his moral ideal and ethical teaching can be gathered, without development of the metaphysical background. He illustrates in the highest degree that union of the mystical and scientific genius which some have thought essential to the philosopher.


Crito and Socrates in Prison

CRITO. Greek Text: C. F. Hermann. Crito, one of Socrates' friends, visits him in prison and endeavours to persuade him to escape, for which object ample resources have been provided by Socrates' friends.

Crito. But, O Socrates, best of friends, even at this hour be persuaded by me and save yourself. For if you should die, not one misfortune alone would befall me, but in addition to my being bereaved of such a friend as I shall never find again, many who do not know us well, will suppose that though I could have saved you, if I had been willing to spend money, I failed to do so. And what more shameful reputation could there be than this, to value money more than one's friends! For most people will not be persuaded that you have refused to escape in spite of our entreaties.

Socrates. But why, dear Crito, does the opinion of the multitude matter so much to us? For the righteous, whom we ought to regard more, will think that these things have happened as they have happened.

Crito. But you see none the less, Socrates, that it is neces-

-52-

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Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Contents xxxix
  • Greek Ethical Thought 1
  • Theognis - 565-490 B.C. 15
  • Simonides - 556-467 B.C. 17
  • Bacchylides - Probably 507-428 B.C. 18
  • Aeschylus - 525-456 B.C. 20
  • Sophocles - 495-406 B.C. 26
  • Euripides - 480-406 B.C. 29
  • Anaximander of Miletus 33
  • Philolaus - Fifth Century B.C. 33
  • Democritus of Abdera 36
  • Thucydides - 460-400 B.C. 39
  • Xenophon's "Memorabilia" 46
  • Plato - 427-347 B.C. 52
  • Aristotle - 384-322 B.C. 142
  • Epicurus - 342-270 B.C. 190
  • The Stoics - The First Heads of the Stoa 199
  • Epictetus - About A.D. 50 to A.D. 130 209
  • The Thoughts Of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus - Born A.D. 121. Emperor A.D. 161. Died A.D. 180 216
  • Index of Authors, Works, And Chief Ethical Subjects 223
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