The Gulf War and the New World Order: International Relations of the Middle East

By Tareq Y. Ismael; Jacqueline S. Ismael | Go to book overview

Tafila, and through their concern for the poor, for orphans and for prisoners of war. I am certain that they will be amply rewarded for their noble endeavors.

Fellow Citizens, Beloved Brethren,

No sooner had one journey ended than another began. The history of this land has been one of tireless activity, since the time the Martyr King Sharif Abdullah Ibn Al-Hussein laid down the cornerstone of the illustrious salt school, presented the flag to the first battalion of our Arab legion and recited the fatiha in honor of the first martyr. Of the army the martyr king had said, "This is an army which does not shame its commanders, does not disappoint its generals, does not let down its people, does not hold back, does not shirk the task of protecting its rights and those of the its country. The army is only an army. It is the country's sword, its shield, its pride, its voice, its whip, the bane of its enemies and the apple of its king's eye." It has been so since the time the king--God rest his soul-- declared the enlightened message of Jordan, where no one is stronger than the oppressed until their rights are restored, or weaker than the oppressors until their rights are taken away from them, where its people stand united while others are plagued by disarray; where they advance while others hold back; where they keep up the struggle to ensure that none in the land remains poor, afraid or downtrodden.


Notes
1.
Immediately after the end of hostilities against Iraq, almost every Arab leader, as well as the newspapers, began speaking of "closing the Arab ranks" again or of "purifying the Arab atmosphere."
2.
See, for example, Ann M. Lesch, "Contrasting Reaction to the Persian Gulf Crisis: Egypt, Syria, Jordan and the Palestinians," Middle East Journal ( 50) 1 (Winter, 1991): 31-3344.
3.
Stanley Reed, "Jordan and the Gulf Crisis'" Foreign Affairs 69 (Winter 1990-1991): 23.
4.
Ibid., 24.
5.
This view was expressed by Adnan Abu Odeh, special political advisor to King Hussein, in his lecture, "The Gulf Crisis'" World Affairs Council, Amman ( 12 January 1991).

-381-

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The Gulf War and the New World Order: International Relations of the Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - The Gulf War and the International Order 23
  • 1 - Reflections on the Gulf War Experience 25
  • Notes 38
  • 2 - The United Nations in the Gulf War 50
  • 3 - Bush's New World Order 52
  • Notes 73
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - The European Community's Middle Eastern Policy 107
  • 5 - Regional Cooperation and Security in the Middle East the Role of the European Community 116
  • Notes 129
  • 6 - Japan 132
  • References 148
  • Part II - The United States and the New World Order 151
  • 7 - Between Theory and Fact 153
  • Notes 174
  • 8 - The New World Order and the Gulf War 184
  • Notes 217
  • 9 - The Making of the New World Order 240
  • 10 - Defeating the Vietnam Syndrome 242
  • Notes 258
  • Part III - The Gulf War and the Middle East Order 263
  • 11 - Iraq and the New World Order 290
  • 12 - Iran and the New World Order 313
  • 13 - The Gulf War, the Palestinians, and the New World Order 339
  • 14 - Israel and the New World Order 347
  • Notes 363
  • 15 - Jordan and the Gulf War 381
  • 16 - Syria, the Kuwait War, and the New World Order 395
  • 17 - Imagining Egypt in the New Age 399
  • Notes 430
  • 18 - Turkey, the Gulf Crisis, and the New World Order 446
  • Part IV - Political Trends and Cultural Patterns 449
  • 19 - The Middle East in the New World Order 451
  • Acknowledgments 468
  • Acknowledgments 469
  • 20 - Islam, Democracy, and the Arab Future 473
  • Acknowledgments 497
  • Notes 497
  • 21 - Islam at War and Communism in Retreat What is the Connection? 502
  • Acknowledgments 520
  • Notes 520
  • 22 - Global Apartheid? 521
  • Notes 535
  • 23 - Democracy Died at the Gulf 548
  • Contributors 549
  • Index 554
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