Coping: The Psychology of What Works

By C. R. Snyder | Go to book overview

Foreword

Robert Frank

In many ways, the field of psychology stands at yet another critical crossroads. Clinical practitioners find their practices eroded by increasingly aggressive competition with other health professions and reluctance by healthcare payors to fund psychological treatments or assessment. At the same time, psychological researchers are reevaluating the direction of the science enterprise within the profession. Increasingly, there is emphasis on the "psychology of the positive" in contrast to historic models based on psychopathology. A recent president of the American Psychological Association, Martin Seligman, from the University of Pennsylvania, crystallized national attention on the relatively uncharted human emotions. Seligman noted that most research focuses on psychopathology and often ignores positive emotions such as joy or courage (1). Seligman has emphasized the advantage of studying emotions that have been neglected, such as "virtues, courage, or hope." Seligman's plea found an empathetic audience among psychologists and, indeed, among the general public. Now, this volume, Coping: The Psychology of What Works, focuses the growing academic and public interests in the spectrum of emotion and how coping affects emotion. In addition, it addresses the importance of coping to both healthy functioning and the so-called "positive emotions," as well as the consequences of deficiencies in coping that lead to the manifestation of psychopathology.

Snyder and his colleagues have previously addressed the broader questions regarding the interface between social and clinical psychology (2,3). In these works, Snyder and colleagues demonstrated the increasing synergies between two previously distinct fields. Clearly, clinical processes are substantially augmented by a distinct understanding of social psychology. In this volume, Snyder has drawn together a remarkably talented pool of authors to articulate the power of coping to psychological health. There is

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Coping: The Psychology of What Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • References ix
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Contributors xv
  • 1: Coping Where Have You Been? 3
  • References 14
  • 2: Reality Negotiation and Coping the Social Construction of Adaptive Outcomes 20
  • References 39
  • 3: Coping and Ego Depletion Recovery After the Coping Process 50
  • References 65
  • 4: Sharing One's Story Translating Emotional Experiences into Words as a Coping Tool 70
  • References 86
  • 5: Focusing on Emotion an Adaptive Coping Strategy? 90
  • References 111
  • 6: Personality, Affectivity, and Coping 119
  • References 136
  • 7: Coping Intelligently Emotional Intelligence and the Coping Process 141
  • References 160
  • 8: Learned Optimism in Children 165
  • References 178
  • 9: Optimism 182
  • Concluding Comment 200
  • References 201
  • 10: Hoping 205
  • References 222
  • Appendix A: the Children's Hope Scale 228
  • Appendix B: the Adult Trait Hope Scale 230
  • 11: Mastery-Oriented Thinking 232
  • References 250
  • 12: Coping with Catastrophes and Catastrophizing 252
  • References 273
  • 13: Finding Benefits in Adversity 279
  • References 298
  • References 320
  • 15: Coping Where Are You Going? 324
  • References 333
  • Index 335
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