Coping: The Psychology of What Works

By C. R. Snyder | Go to book overview
ing the physicians' needs by complying with treatment recommendations) comes to be recognized as "good" coping? In our own section above on the limiting considerations in adaptive reality negotiation, we cite failure to comply with treatment recommendations as a potentially fatal complica- tion of overly positive self-illusions. This is despite empirical evidence that adherence to medical recommendations in cases of chronic health problems is only weakly associated with improved health outcomes (157). Again, is it possible that the value that (we) health professionals place on patients' actively adhering to treatment recommendations derives from (our) the professional's needs to feel efficacious? Although research paradigms often foster the illusion that the outcomes of queries are determined by the "subjects," we are left wondering about the extent to which the findings actually reflect the outcomes of dynamically interacting systems aimed at negotiating mutually agreeable realities.In this chapter we have provided an overview of the reality-negotiation construct and some of the processes related to it. Reality negotiation is fundamental to virtually all human enterprises where individual interests are involved and outcomes depend on our ability to symbolize. Given this potential scope, our illustrations have been, by necessity, highly selected and limited. Our use of problems related to illness and disability as illus- trations in no way defines this as the primary or only domain of interest. Rather, our use of a problem area that eventually touches all of us may afford the reader a more personal glimpse of the diversity of issues that attend our efforts to make our way in this life. With reference to the impossibility of making something be what it is not, it has often been said that you can't make silk purses from sows' ears. While this may literally be so, our capacity to negotiate how we perceive things tells us that, so long as the interests of the individual and interested others converge and they approach the enterprise with a common purpose, nobody will know the difference.
References
1. Snyder C. R., & Higgins R. L. ( 1988). "Excuses: Their effective role in the negotiation of reality". Psychological Bulletin, 104, 23-35.
2. Snyder C. R., & Higgins R. L. ( 1988). "Excuse attributions: Do they work?" In S. L. Zelen (Ed.), Self-representation: The second attribution- personality theory conference (pp. 50-122). New York: Springer- Verlag.
3. Snyder C. R. ( 1989). "Reality negotiation: From excuses to hope and beyond". Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 8, 130-157.
4. Barone D. F., Maddux J. E., & Snyder C. R. ( 1997). Social cognitive psychology: History and current domains. New York: Plenum Press.
5. Snyder C. R., & Higgins R. L. ( 1997). "Reality negotiation: Governing one's self and being governed by others". General Psychology Review, 1, 336-350.

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coping: The Psychology of What Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • References ix
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Contributors xv
  • 1: Coping Where Have You Been? 3
  • References 14
  • 2: Reality Negotiation and Coping the Social Construction of Adaptive Outcomes 20
  • References 39
  • 3: Coping and Ego Depletion Recovery After the Coping Process 50
  • References 65
  • 4: Sharing One's Story Translating Emotional Experiences into Words as a Coping Tool 70
  • References 86
  • 5: Focusing on Emotion an Adaptive Coping Strategy? 90
  • References 111
  • 6: Personality, Affectivity, and Coping 119
  • References 136
  • 7: Coping Intelligently Emotional Intelligence and the Coping Process 141
  • References 160
  • 8: Learned Optimism in Children 165
  • References 178
  • 9: Optimism 182
  • Concluding Comment 200
  • References 201
  • 10: Hoping 205
  • References 222
  • Appendix A: the Children's Hope Scale 228
  • Appendix B: the Adult Trait Hope Scale 230
  • 11: Mastery-Oriented Thinking 232
  • References 250
  • 12: Coping with Catastrophes and Catastrophizing 252
  • References 273
  • 13: Finding Benefits in Adversity 279
  • References 298
  • References 320
  • 15: Coping Where Are You Going? 324
  • References 333
  • Index 335
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.