Coping: The Psychology of What Works

By C. R. Snyder | Go to book overview

3
Coping and Ego Depletion Recovery after the Coping Process

Roy F. Baumeister Jon E. Faber Harry M. Wallace

In this chapter, we combine a new approach to the self with a traditional, standard idea about coping in order to understand the coping process. The central idea is that many operations of the self involve the consumption of a limited resource. This resource is used in volition (e.g., choice, responsible decision-making, and active responses) and self-control. Stress makes severe demands on this resource, because people must engage in active responding and must regulate themselves so as to adapt to difficult circumstances. One major consequence of stress is that the resource becomes depleted. This will impair the person's functioning across a broad spectrum of activities. For the person to recover, therefore, this resource must be replenished. Although it has been recognized previously that coping with stress consumes resources (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4), our analysis differs in that it offers more in-depth insight into the nature of this resource.

Another important distinction of the present model is that the depletion of resources results from the individual's responses and coping efforts, rather than from the stress itself. In a sense, then, our focus is on how the person recovers from coping rather than on how the person copes with stress. A stressful event will demand coping responses, and these will deplete the person's resources. Having coped with the trauma, however, the person may suffer from the adverse depleting effects of the coping process. The person will not be back to normal until this recovery from coping is complete.

It should be acknowledged that the links between this ego depletion model and recovery from coping are somewhat speculative at present. We are suggesting previously unexplored links between separate and fairly well-established literatures.

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Coping: The Psychology of What Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • References ix
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Contributors xv
  • 1: Coping Where Have You Been? 3
  • References 14
  • 2: Reality Negotiation and Coping the Social Construction of Adaptive Outcomes 20
  • References 39
  • 3: Coping and Ego Depletion Recovery After the Coping Process 50
  • References 65
  • 4: Sharing One's Story Translating Emotional Experiences into Words as a Coping Tool 70
  • References 86
  • 5: Focusing on Emotion an Adaptive Coping Strategy? 90
  • References 111
  • 6: Personality, Affectivity, and Coping 119
  • References 136
  • 7: Coping Intelligently Emotional Intelligence and the Coping Process 141
  • References 160
  • 8: Learned Optimism in Children 165
  • References 178
  • 9: Optimism 182
  • Concluding Comment 200
  • References 201
  • 10: Hoping 205
  • References 222
  • Appendix A: the Children's Hope Scale 228
  • Appendix B: the Adult Trait Hope Scale 230
  • 11: Mastery-Oriented Thinking 232
  • References 250
  • 12: Coping with Catastrophes and Catastrophizing 252
  • References 273
  • 13: Finding Benefits in Adversity 279
  • References 298
  • References 320
  • 15: Coping Where Are You Going? 324
  • References 333
  • Index 335
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