Coping: The Psychology of What Works

By C. R. Snyder | Go to book overview
those who have experienced traumatic events, especially intentional trauma, are not only catastrophizers but also socially estranged, any therapeutic intervention needs to occur in an explicitly supportive context (84).Trauma engenders many attempts at coping; avoidance and wishful thinking were among the most commonly reported strategies among a group of trauma survivors attending a stress clinic (85). None of these common strategies seemed to mitigate distress. In contrast, the less frequently used strategies of positive reappraisal and distancing did seem effective, suggesting that these might be explicitly encouraged in interventions that follow trauma.Indeed, we know that people can be taught to cope better in the wake of a catastrophic event. There is a large literature on coping with respect to chronic pain. Useful strategies include (86, 87, 88):
decatastrophizing
diverting attention elsewhere
ignoring or suppressing pain
increasing activity level
reinterpreting pain
relaxing and deep breathing
Some of these techniques are specific to pain, but others are generally applicable, such as decatastrophizing and reinterpreting. An important qualification of any advice concerning coping emerges from research into the effectiveness of these strategies. Studies with pain patients suggest that the various cognitive-behavioral interventions used to encourage coping with pain do not work for patients who catastrophize (e.g., 89, 90, 91). If catastrophizing does not change, then nothing else will help. The importance of catastrophizing tendencies is underscored, and the therapist must take them into account and make changing them a priority.
References
1. Ryan W. ( 1978). Blaming the victim (Rev. ed.). New York: Random House.
2. American Psychiatric Association. ( 1987). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders ( 3rd ed., Rev.). Washington, DC: author.
3. American Psychiatric Association. ( 1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders ( 4th ed.). Washington, DC: author.
4. Holmes T. H., & Rahe R. H. ( 1967). "The social readjustment rating scale". Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 11, 213-218.
5. Baker S. P., O'Neill B., Ginsburg M. J., & Li G. ( 1992). The injury fact book ( 2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.
6. Kanner A. D., Coyne J. C., Schaefer C., & Lazarus R. S. ( 1981). "Comparison of two modes of stress measurement: Daily hassles and uplifts versus major life events". Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 4, 1-39.
7. Robertson L. S. ( 1992). "Injury epidemiology". New York: Oxford University Press.

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coping: The Psychology of What Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • References ix
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Contributors xv
  • 1: Coping Where Have You Been? 3
  • References 14
  • 2: Reality Negotiation and Coping the Social Construction of Adaptive Outcomes 20
  • References 39
  • 3: Coping and Ego Depletion Recovery After the Coping Process 50
  • References 65
  • 4: Sharing One's Story Translating Emotional Experiences into Words as a Coping Tool 70
  • References 86
  • 5: Focusing on Emotion an Adaptive Coping Strategy? 90
  • References 111
  • 6: Personality, Affectivity, and Coping 119
  • References 136
  • 7: Coping Intelligently Emotional Intelligence and the Coping Process 141
  • References 160
  • 8: Learned Optimism in Children 165
  • References 178
  • 9: Optimism 182
  • Concluding Comment 200
  • References 201
  • 10: Hoping 205
  • References 222
  • Appendix A: the Children's Hope Scale 228
  • Appendix B: the Adult Trait Hope Scale 230
  • 11: Mastery-Oriented Thinking 232
  • References 250
  • 12: Coping with Catastrophes and Catastrophizing 252
  • References 273
  • 13: Finding Benefits in Adversity 279
  • References 298
  • References 320
  • 15: Coping Where Are You Going? 324
  • References 333
  • Index 335
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.