Coping: The Psychology of What Works

By C. R. Snyder | Go to book overview
The concept of coping occupies an important place within the psyche of cultures more generally, and with people specifically. To answer the rhetorical question that forms the "Coping: Where Are You Going?" title of this final chapter, the link between now and the future will be written as a saga of coping in which, individually and communally, we will strive to deal successfully with the stressors that come our way. This volume offers a partial road map of our travels on this coping journey so far, as well as what lies ahead. Wherever coping goes, so too will our civilization . . . and vice versa.
References
1. Snyder C. R. ( 1994). The psychology of hope: You can get there from here. New York: Free Press.
2. Snyder C. R. ( 1997). "State of the interface between clinical and social psychology". Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 16( 3), 231-242.
3. Seligman M. E. P. ( 1998, February 10). Optimism, hope, and ending the epidemic of depression. Paper presented at the Science of Optimism and Hope: A Research Symposium. Philadelphia.
4. Lazarus R. S. ( 1991). "Evaluating psychosocial factors in health". In C. R. Snyder & D. R. Forsyth (Eds.), Handbook of social and clinical psychology: The health perspective (p. 798). Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
5. Wright B. A. ( 1991). "Labeling: The need for greater person- environment individuation". In C. R. Snyder & D. R Forsyth (Eds.), Handbook of social and clinical psychology: The health perspective (pp. 469-487). Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
6. Snyder C. R., & Fromkin H. L. ( 1980). Uniqueness: The human pursuit of difference. New York: Plenum.
7. Neimeyer R. A., & Mahoney M. J. (Eds.) ( 1995). Constructivism in psychotherapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
8. Breznitz S. ( 1983). Anticipatory stress and denial. In S. Breznitz (Ed.), The denial of stress (pp. 225-255). New York: International Universities Press.
9. Folkman S., & Lazarus R. S. ( 1985). "If it changes, it must be a process: Study of emotion and coping during three stages of a college examination". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 48, 150-170.
10. Aspinwall L. G., & Taylor S. E. ( 1997). "A stitch in time: Self-regulation and proactive coping". Psychological Bulletin, 121, 417-436.
11. Taylor S. E., & Pham L. B. ( 1996). "Mental simulation, motivation, and action". In P. E. Gollwitzer & J. A. Bargh (Eds.), The psychology of action: Linking cognition and motivation to behavior (pp. 219-235). New York: Guilford.
12. Taylor S. E., & Schneider S. K. ( 1989). "Coping and the simulation of events". Social Cognition, 7, 174-194.

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Coping: The Psychology of What Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • References ix
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Contributors xv
  • 1: Coping Where Have You Been? 3
  • References 14
  • 2: Reality Negotiation and Coping the Social Construction of Adaptive Outcomes 20
  • References 39
  • 3: Coping and Ego Depletion Recovery After the Coping Process 50
  • References 65
  • 4: Sharing One's Story Translating Emotional Experiences into Words as a Coping Tool 70
  • References 86
  • 5: Focusing on Emotion an Adaptive Coping Strategy? 90
  • References 111
  • 6: Personality, Affectivity, and Coping 119
  • References 136
  • 7: Coping Intelligently Emotional Intelligence and the Coping Process 141
  • References 160
  • 8: Learned Optimism in Children 165
  • References 178
  • 9: Optimism 182
  • Concluding Comment 200
  • References 201
  • 10: Hoping 205
  • References 222
  • Appendix A: the Children's Hope Scale 228
  • Appendix B: the Adult Trait Hope Scale 230
  • 11: Mastery-Oriented Thinking 232
  • References 250
  • 12: Coping with Catastrophes and Catastrophizing 252
  • References 273
  • 13: Finding Benefits in Adversity 279
  • References 298
  • References 320
  • 15: Coping Where Are You Going? 324
  • References 333
  • Index 335
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