Social Movements in Advanced Capitalism: The Political Economy and Cultural Construction of Social Activism

By Steven M. Buechler | Go to book overview

Epilogue

Social movements are intentional, collective efforts to transform social order. They are a distinctly modern phenomenon, resting on the sociological insight that society is a social construction that is susceptible to reconstruction through collective action. The unfolding of modernity has enhanced the reflexivity about social order that is the hallmark of both the sociological imagination and social movements.

As the twentieth century draws to a close, there are substantial reasons for pessimism about whether this increased capacity for reflexivity will be used to enhance the quality of life in an equitable manner. And different observers will arrive at very different balance sheets about the cumulatively positive or negative effects of collective action on the shape of the modern world.

There is little doubt that some social movements have and will continue to succumb to revolutionary dogmatism, sectarian infighting, rigid fanaticism, and genocidal hatred. But the sociological imagination requires that our judgments of such movements be tempered with an analysis of the circumstances that provoke such responses, and that we not divorce these movements from their social contexts.

The sociological imagination also requires not just recognition but cultivation of the promise of social movements. Movements can be sites of heightened reflexivity and enhanced capacity to direct the self-production of society. Movements can be opportunities for ordinary people to make their own history. Movements can be carriers of evolutionary alternatives in a rapidly changing world. Movements can be vital learning mechanisms in an era of increasing complexity. Movements can be effective means of resisting instrumental rationality and the commodification of everyday life. Movements can be powerful ways of identifying problems, redistributing resources, broadening participation, and building solidarity. Movements can be havens in a heartless world

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Movements in Advanced Capitalism: The Political Economy and Cultural Construction of Social Activism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.