Canadian Regions: A Geography of Canada

By Donald F. Putnam | Go to book overview

Editor's Preface

CANADIAN REGIONS is a geography of Canada. Its purpose is to provide a balanced and up-to-date treatment of the available geographic information. It has been written in the hope that it will prove useful alike to the outsider who wishes to learn about Canada and to the Canadian who wishes to develop a better understanding of his own country.

CANADIAN REGIONS is the work of four authors. By combining the results of their personal observations, researches and teaching experiences, it has been possible to produce a well rounded and authoritative book. Editorial efforts have been directed mainly toward preserving balance in so far as possible, without disturbing the style, organization or emphasis in the various sections.

The statistics are as up-to-date as it was possible to make them at the time of going to press. Some of the data are from the reports of the census of 1941, some from government publications issued at various times during the past decade, while population figures from the preliminary bulletins of the census of 1951 have been inserted during proof reading. The student, the teacher of geography, or the man of affairs will always have available the latest edition of the Canada Year Book and will be able to make his own revisions. While accurate data constitute an essential part of geography, it is more important to make correct interpretations and correlations.

This book could not have been compiled without the co-operation and goodwill of numerous persons and organizations in all parts of the country. Among these may be mentioned officials in various departments of the governments of Canada and all ten provinces, municipal officials, boards of trade and chambers of commerce in many towns and cities. Numerous photographs were made available by the National Film Board; the Royal Canadian Air Force; the Photographic Survey Corporation Limited, Toronto, Ontario; Photographic Surveys ( Quebec) Limited, Montreal; Canadian National Railways; Canadian Pacific Railways; Experimental Farms Services; Provincial Publicity Bureau, Quebec; British Columbia

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Canadian Regions: A Geography of Canada
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 604

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.