Canadian Regions: A Geography of Canada

By Donald F. Putnam | Go to book overview
Courtesy Exp. Farms Service. Plate 29 . Potato Storehouse in the St. John Valley, New Brunswick.

of the southern part being of British origin while those of the north are French. For the most part the people are rural dwellers but there are a number of small towns; Woodstock and Grand Falls being the most important. The latter is noted for the hydroelectric development on the St. John River and for the wide boulevard on its main street. At Hartland, a covered wooden bridge 1,280 feet in length spans the St. John River. A potato starch factory is located at Hartland.


IX. Central and Northern New Brunswick

Several factors combine to set this region apart from the rest. While it has sea coast and valley areas a large part of it is rather elevated and it has a cool climate. It is largely an unsettled and forested region, the source of much of the lumber and pulpwood produced in the province. It has several large rivers which have proved of great value in transporting logs from the interior, and as a source of power.

The population is preponderantly of French origin and speech, and is rapidly increasing. In consequence a number of pioneer areas are being opened up.

Edmunston, the county seat of Madawaska county, is the largest town. The census of 1941 recorded 7,096 inhabitants but the town is growing rapidly and in 1950 was estimated to have a population of over 10,000. It is located on the St. John River at the mouth of the Madawaska, opposite the town of Madawaska, Maine. It is an important gateway, railway junction and node, leading to both the U.S.A. and the province of Quebec. It is the headquarters of the largest pulp and paper manufacturer in the Maritime Provinces, as well as smaller concerns. An important retail centre, it is the outfitting point for the loggers, pulpwood cutters and sportsmen of the forests of northwestern New Brunswick.

Campbellton, at the head of navigation on the Restigouche River, has a population of 8,000 and is a railway divisional point and an important lumbering centre. There is a pulp mill at nearby Atholville. Dalhousie (5,000), sixteen miles west of Campbellton, has a large pulp and paper mill.


Selected References

Harrington Lyn. "The Cabot Trail". Canadian Geographical Journal XXXVI, pp. 204-21. 1948.

Harvey D. C. "Charlottetown". Canadian Geographic Journal IV, pp. 201-19. 1932.

Harvey D. C. "Halifax", 1749- 1949. Canadian Geographical XXXVIII, pp. 6-37. 1949.

Peacock Fletcher. The Province of New Brunswick-Geographical Aspects. Canadian Geographical Society. Ottawa. 1949.

Phillips Fred H. "Fredericton--Centennial City". Canadian Geographical Journal XXXVI, pp. 80-93. 1948.

Shaw Lloyd W. Province of Prince Edward Island. Geographical Aspects. Canadian Geographical Society. Ottawa. 1949.

Simpson R. A. Province of Nova Scotia. Geographical Aspects. Canadian Geographical Society. Ottawa. 1949.

Taylor G. "Town Patterns in the Gulf of St. Lawrence". Canadian Geographic Journal XXX, pp. 254-75. 1945.

Webster J. C. Historical Guide to New Brunswick. Fredericton. 1944.

-122-

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