Canadian Regions: A Geography of Canada

By Donald F. Putnam | Go to book overview

after confederation, there were less than 8,000, mainly in Algoma, Manitoulin and Nipissing. By 1891, after the first wave of railroad building, the number had risen to 55,000; by 1901 it was almost 100,000. During the next decade the developments at the Lakehead, the Soo, Sudbury and the discovery of three mining fields in northeastern Ontario shot the total to 238,000. There was little increase in the period of Great War I but since then the curve has steadily advanced until there are now more than half a million people in Northern Ontario. (Figure 191).

The population of Northern Ontario is of mixed origin; 45% of the people stem from the British Isles and 25% from France while 31 1/2% are of native Indian descent. A mixture of other people, mainly of European stock, make up the remaining 26 1/2%, including Finns, Scandinavians, Italians, Ukrainians, Poles and Russians in large numbers.

In 1941 only about half the people were reported as rural dwellers but the actual number is even less, for many large mining centres are towns in everything but their form of government, and their citizens should be counted as urban dwellers. Recent years, also, have seen a greater increase in urban development than in rural settlement. Northern Ontario is thinly peopled, its average population density is only 1.25 per square mile.


Selected References

Burrows A. G. et al. The Porcupine Gold Area. Rept. of the Ont. Dept. of Mines. Vol. XXXIII. Part III, pp. 1-105. 1924.

Burrows A. G. and H. C. Rickaby. Sudbury Nickel Field Restudied. Report of the Ont. Dept. of Mines. Vol. XLIII. Part II, pp. 1- 45, 1934.

Canada Department of Mines and Resources. Geology and Economic Minerals of Canada. Economic Geology Series No. 1. (Third Edition). Ottawa. 1947.

Coleman A. P. Lake Ojibway; Last of the Great Glacial Lakes. Report of the Ont. Dept. of Mines. Vol. XIV. Part I, pp. 213-47. 1905.

Henderson Archibald. Agricultural Resources of the Abitibi. Report of the Ont. Dept. of Mines. Vol. XIV. Part I, pp. 213-47. 1905.

Hills G. A. "Pedology, the Dirt Science and Agricultural Settlement in Ontario". Can. Geog. Jour. 29, pp. 106-27. 1944.

Hills G. A. and F. F. Morwick. Reconnaisance Soil Survey of Parts of Northwestern Ontario. Guelph. 1944.

Hurst M. E. "General Geology of Ontario". Canadian Mining Journal. Vol. 71:11, pp. 102-6. Nov. 1950.

Moore E. S. "Elementary Geology for Canada". J. M. Dent & Sons. Toronto. 1944.

Nichols D. A. "The Geographic Setting of Northern Ontario". Canadian Geographical Journal 18, pp. 147-151. 1939.

Report to the Ontario Legislature from the Select Committee on Conservation. Toronto. 1950.

Satterley J. Geology of the Dryden-Wabigoon Area. Report of the Ont. Dept. of Mines. Vol. L. Part II, pp. 1-62. 1941.

Sharp J. F. and J. A. Brodie. The Forest Resources of Ontario. 1930. Ont. Dept. of Lands & Forests. Toronto. 1931.

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