Violence against Women in Medieval Texts

By Anna Roberts | Go to book overview

Violence against Women in Medieval Texts

Edited by Anna Roberts

University Press of Florida Gainesville Tallahassee Tampa Boca Raton Pensacola Orlando Miami Jacksonville

-iii-

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Violence against Women in Medieval Texts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Introduction Violence Against Women and the Habits of Thought 1
  • Notes 21
  • 1: The Violence of Exegesis - Reading the Bodies of Ælfric's Female Saints 22
  • Works Cited 41
  • 2: Women, Power, and Violence in Orderic Vitatis's Historia Ecclesiastica 44
  • Notes 52
  • Works Cited 54
  • 3: The Mont St. Michel Giant Sexual Violence and Imperialism in the Chronicles of Wace and Laʓamon 56
  • Works Cited 73
  • 4: Consuming Passions Variations on the Eaten Heart Theme 75
  • Notes 91
  • Works Cited 94
  • 5: The Rhetoric of Incest in the Middle English Emaré 97
  • Works Cited 113
  • 6: "Quiting" Eve: Violence Against Women in the Canterbury Tales 115
  • Notes 133
  • Works Cited 135
  • 7: Rivalry, Rape, and Manhood: Gower and Chaucer 137
  • Notes 149
  • Works Cited 157
  • 8: Gender Subversion and Linguistic Castration in Fifteenth-Century English Translations of Christine De Pizan 161
  • Notes 188
  • Works Cited 189
  • 9: Domesticating the Spanish Inquisition 195
  • Notes 205
  • 10: Violence, Silence, and the Memory of Witches 210
  • Notes 224
  • Works Cited 227
  • Contributors 233
  • Index 237
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