About the Editor and Contributors

Donald F. Barnett is president of Economic Associates Inc. (EAI), based in Great Falls, VA. EAI provides corporate planning, privatization, acquisition, and business development advice to steel-related industries in the United States and throughout the world. Prior to establishing EAI, Dr. Barnett was a senior economist at the World Bank, where he instigated and implemented restructuring programs in many world steel industries (e.g., Indonesia, Hungary, Peru, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Egypt). While serving as a senior policy adviser in the White House, he played a major role in establishing the trigger price mechanism. Dr. Barnett is the author of numerous books and articles. His books on the steel industry include Steel: Upheaval in a Basic Industry (with L. Schorsch) and Up from the Ashes: The Rise of the Steel Minimill in the United States (with R. Crandall). Dr. Barnett received his Ph.D. in economics from Queen's University in Canada, following master's-level training in mining and metallurgical engineering.

Thomas Cottrell is an associate professor in the Faculty of Management at the University of Calgary, where he lectures on strategy at the undergraduate, master's, and doctoral levels. His fascination with software began with BASIC programming on a Prime minicomputer in the early 1980s; most of his recent research would not have been feasible without a knowledge of C. Professor Cottrell's research interests are primarily in the field of technology strategy in emerging industries characterized by network externalities. Professor Cottrell worked as a Certified Public Accountant for Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Microsoft Corporation prior to completing doctoral work at the University of California, Berkeley.

Robert W. Crandall is a senior fellow in the Economic Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. He has specialized in industrial organization, antitrust policy, and the economics of government regulation. He is author of Talk Is Cheap: The Promise of Regulatory Reform in North American Telecommunications (with Leonard Waverman); The Extra Mile: Rethinking Energy Policy for Automotive Transportation (with Pietro Nivola); Manufacturing on the Move; Up from the Ashes: The Rise of the Steel Minimill in the United States (with Donald F. Barnett ); The Scientific Basis of Health and Safety Regulation (with Lester B. Lave); Regulating the Automobile (with H. Gruenspecht, T. Keeler , and L. Lave); Controlling Industrial Pollution; and The U.S. Steel Industry in Recurrent Crisis, as well as other books and numerous journal articles. Dr. Crandall has taught economics at Northwestern University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Maryland, George Washington University, and the Stanford in Washington program. Prior to assum-

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