I Was Born a Slave: An Anthology of Classic Slave Narratives, 1770-1849 - Vol. 1

By Yuval Taylor | Go to book overview

I Was Born a Slave
AN ANTHOLOGY OF CLASSIC SLAVE NARRATIVES

VOLUME ONE

1770-1849

EDITED BY Yuval Taylor

FOREWORD BY Charles Johnson

Lawrence Hill Books

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
I Was Born a Slave: An Anthology of Classic Slave Narratives, 1770-1849 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Library of Black America ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xv
  • James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw 1
  • Narrative of the Most Remarkable Particulars in the Life of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, an African Prince, as Related by Himself 4
  • The Preface to the Reader 6
  • Olaudah Equiano (Gustavus Vassa) 29
  • The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself 34
  • To the Lords Spiritual and Temporal,14 and the Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain 35
  • List of Subscribers.15 36
  • Contents of Volume I 40
  • Chapter I 41
  • Chapter II 51
  • Chapter III 61
  • Chapter IV 70
  • Chapter V 82
  • Chapter VI 94
  • The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African 106
  • Contents of Volume II 108
  • Chapter VII 109
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter IX 126
  • Chapter X 136
  • Chapter XI 148
  • Chapter XII 162
  • William Grimes 181
  • Life of William Grimes, the Runaway Slave. Written by Himself 184
  • To the Public 186
  • Life of William Grimes 187
  • Nat Turner 235
  • The Confessions of Nat Turner, the Leader of the Late Insurrection in Southampton, Va. 240
  • To the Public 242
  • Charles Ball 259
  • Slavery in the United States: A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Charles Ball, , - A Black Man 263
  • Preface 264
  • Chapter I 265
  • Chapter II 270
  • Chapter II 273
  • Chapter IV 279
  • Chapter V 288
  • Chapter VI 304
  • Chapter VIII 312
  • Chapter IX 318
  • Chapter X 328
  • Chapter XI 340
  • Chapter XII 348
  • Chapter XIII 354
  • Chapter XIV 373
  • Chapter XV 383
  • Chapter XVI 398
  • Chapter XVII 406
  • Chapter XVIII 413
  • Chapter XIX 417
  • Chapter XX 437
  • Chapter XXI 445
  • Chapter XXII 460
  • Chapter XXIII 461
  • Chapter XXIV 469
  • Chapter XXV 475
  • Chapter XXVI 485
  • Moses Roper 487
  • A Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper, from American Slavery; 489
  • Preface 490
  • Introduction 492
  • Frederick Douglass 523
  • Preface 530
  • Chapter I 537
  • Chapter II 540
  • Chapter II 543
  • Chapter IV 546
  • Chapter V 548
  • Chapter VI 551
  • Chapter VIII 553
  • Chapter IX 557
  • Chapter X 560
  • Chapter XI 563
  • Chapter XII 582
  • Appendix 592
  • Lewis and Milton Clarke 601
  • Narratives of the Sufferings of Lewis and Milton Clarke, Sons of a Soldier of the Revolution, during a Captivity of More Than Twenty Years among the Slaveholders of Kentucky, One of the So Called Christian States of North America. Dictated by Themselves 605
  • Preface 606
  • Narrative of Milton Clarke 636
  • Preface 637
  • Appendix 652
  • Order of Exercises for a Slaveholders' Meeting 666
  • William Wells Brown 673
  • Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave 678
  • Preface 681
  • Chapter I 684
  • Chapter II 685
  • Chapter II 686
  • Chapter IV 688
  • Chapter V 691
  • Chapter VI 693
  • Chapter VIII 699
  • Chapter IX 700
  • Chapter X 702
  • Chapter XI 704
  • Chapter XII 706
  • Chapter XIII 708
  • Chapter XIV 710
  • Chapter XV 712
  • Josiah Henson 719
  • The Life of Josiah Henson, Formerly a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, as Narrated by Himself 724
  • Life of Josiah Henson 725
  • Bibliography 757
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 770

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.