The Right to Life Movement and Third Party Politics

By Robert J. Spitzer | Go to book overview

4
PARTY DECAY, PARTY RENEWAL, AND HYBRID MULTI-PARTYISM

One of the premises of this volume has been the uniqueness of the New York multi-party system, in apparent contradistinction to America's two-party heritage. Yet it would be a mistake, I argue, to dismiss this case as a mere quirk pertinent only to state politics enthusiasts. The primary purpose of this final chapter will be to explore, in an admittedly polemical fashion, some of the consequences of the New York system for national party politics, by way of making a modest proposal for party change. Political analysts usually avoid explicit political prescriptions, in part at least because proposals are far easier to shoot down than to construct. But prescriptions can serve a number of intellectual purposes. They can serve to focus debate. They can provide a basis for subsequent reform, even if the end product is different from the initial proposal, and they also force the author to put him/herself "on the line," so to speak, by specifying (and thus clarifying) a general proposal. In any case, they enliven debate.

The other principal concern of this work, itself a consequence both of the New York system and social discontent about abortion practices, is of course the Right to Life Party. Regardless of how one feels about abortion, most would be quick to point to the RTLP as a case which demonstrates the baneful effects of even this kind of modified multi-party system. After all, the RTLP is a small party with a small constituency that has nevertheless exerted at least some, if marginal, influence; it is a party led by zealots disinclined to seek either compromise or the political center; it is a single issue party in a multi-issue world; and

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Right to Life Movement and Third Party Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Exhibits ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 3
  • 1 - Single-Issue Parties in American History 5
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - A Party is Born: Abortion and the Right to Life Party 39
  • Notes 74
  • 3 - Activists and Identifiers 81
  • Summary 100
  • 4 - Party Decay, Party Renewal, and Hybrid Multi-Partyism 107
  • Notes 126
  • Epilogue 133
  • Notes 135
  • Appendix 1 137
  • Appendix 2 140
  • Bibliography 141
  • Index 149
  • About the Author 155
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 158

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.