Handbook of Drug Control in the United States

By James A. Inciardi | Go to book overview

other cities, including the nation's capitol, the crack trade had turned many urban street gangs into ghetto-based trafficking organizations, some with direct connections to high-level South American smugglers. In addition, crack distribution rivalries had touched off homicide epidemics that turned entire stretches of urban America into "dead zones"--anarchic badlands written off by law enforcement officials as too dangerous to patrol. And, too, the crack inner cities had other victims as well--the crack users themselves, whose lives revolved around crack- taking and crack-seeking; the "crack babies," born addicted or suffering from syphilis and abandoned in city hospitals; and the neglected or abused children, discarded, beaten, or killed by their crack-addicted parents. 70


POSTSCRIPT

If anything has been learned from the history of illicit drug use in the United States, it is that it reflects fads, fashions, crazes, and cycles. Various drugs come and go, with their popularities shifting and changing. There have been several so-called "epidemics" involving heroin, cocaine, and numerous other psychotropic agents. For the better part of the 1980s, cocaine and crack were the drugs of the moment. And although their popularity will endure in the 1990s, other drugs will come into prominence--most likely, as was the case with crack, variations on already stylish drugs or, alternatively, rediscoveries of substances previously in vogue. 71


NOTES
1.
E. F. Cook and E. W. Martin, Remington's Practice of Pharmacy ( Easton, Pa.: Mack Publishing Co., 1951); Charles E. Terry and Mildred Pellens, The Opium Problem ( New York: Bureau of Social Hygiene, 1968), 56.
2.
William Buchan, Domestic Medicine: or, A Treatise on the Prevention and Cure of Diseases by Regimen and Simple Medicines ( Philadelphia: Crukshank, Bell, and Muir, 1784), 225-26.
3.
James Harvey Young, The Toadstool Millionaires: A Social History of Patent Medicines in America Before Federal Regulation ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1961), 19-23.
4.
Jerome H. Jaffe and William R. Martin, "Narcotic Analgesics and Antagonists," in The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, ed. Louis S. Goodman and Alfred Gilman ( New York: Macmillan, 1970), 245.
5.
See Roberts Bartholow, A Manual of Hypodermatic Medication ( Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1891).
6.
1897 Sears Roebuck Catalogue ( 1897; reprint, New York: Chelsea House, 1968), 32 of insert on drugs.
7.
Terry and Pellens, The Opium Problem, 1-20. See also H. Wayne Morgan, Yesterday's Addicts: American Society and Drug Abuse 1865-1920 ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1974).
8.
Virgil G. Eaton, "How the Opium Habit Is Acquired," Popular Science Monthly 33 ( 1888): 665-66.

-21-

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