Handbook of Drug Control in the United States

By James A. Inciardi | Go to book overview

Contributors
M. DOUGLAS ANGLIN is Adjunct Associate Professor of Medical Psychology with the Neuropsychiatric Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also Director of the UCLA Drug Abuse Research Group. His research interests include drug abuse epidemiology, intervention, and social policy. He has been Principal Investigator for several long-term follow-up studies of narcotics and cocaine addicts.
JEROME BECK is a doctoral student in the Behavioral Sciences program in the School of Public Health at the University of California at Berkeley. He is also Project Director of a NIDA-funded study on "Exploring Ecstasy: A Descriptive Study of MDMA Users." Over the past fifteen years, he has been involved in most aspects of the drug field: prevention, treatment, education, and research. He has been following the MDMA phenomenon since its emergence in 1977 when he was employed at the University of Oregon Drug Information Center. Mr. Beck has published numerous articles on MDMA and other substances.
GEORGE BESCHNER has been until recently Chief of Community Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. Public Health Service. As an official of NIDA since 1971, he has planned, implemented, and coordinated research and demonstration projects designed to improve drug abuse rehabilitation services and to reduce the risks of AIDS. Previously he was on the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Social Work and Community Planning. He has served as a Training Director with the Office of Economic Opportunity. He has published numerous journal articles and monographs and is co-editor of five books on drug abuse problems.
JOSEPH R. BIDEN, JR., is the Democratic Senator from Delaware and the Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. He was first elected to the Senate

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