Women in Psychology: A Bio-Bibliographic Sourcebook

By Agnes N. O'Connell; Nancy Felipe Russo | Go to book overview

FLORENCE LAURA GOODENOUGH (1886-1959)

Dennis N. Thompson

Florence Goodenough received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1924 and spent her career as a developmental psychologist at the University of Minnesota. Shortly after arriving at Minnesota, she published her Draw-a-Man test, a scale for measuring the intelligence of children by analyzing their drawings. She made numerous contributions to the methodology of studying children, including the development of time sampling and event sampling, research methods still in frequent use today. Following her work on testing and methodological issues, Goodenough turned her attention to the social and emotional development of young children. Her 1931 publication, Anger in Young Children, remains one of the most systematic and detailed analyses of emotional development during early childhood. During her brief career she published important works on a wide variety of additional topics including personality testing, individual differences, and maturation of human potential. Although illness forced an early retirement from the University of Minnesota in 1947, she remained active during her final years, publishing Mental Testing ( 1949), Exceptional Children (1956), and the third edition of her text Developmental Psychology ( 1959).


FAMILY BACKGROUND, EDUCATION, AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT

Florence Goodenough was born on August 6, 1886, in Honesdale, Pennsylvania, to Alice and Linus Goodenough. She was the youngest child in a large farm family of six girls and two boys. In her youth she attended school in Rileyville, Pennsylvania, and in 1908 received a B.Pd. (Bachelor of Pedagogy) from the Millersville, Pennsylvania, Normal School.

She completed her B.S. degree at Columbia University in 1920 and her M.A. at that institution under Leta Hollingworth in 1921. During this same period she served as director of research in the Rutherford and Perth Amboy, New Jersey, public schools. According to Dale Harris, who received his Ph.D. under her direction, this position would today be considered a school psychologist (D. B.

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Women in Psychology: A Bio-Bibliographic Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part I Overview 1
  • Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 3
  • Part II the Women and Their Contributions 11
  • Anne Anastasi (1908- ) 13
  • Nancy Bayley (1899- ) 23
  • Sandra Lipsitz Bem (1944- ) 30
  • Jeanne Humphrey Block (1923-1981) 40
  • Charlotte M. BÜhler (1893-1974) 49
  • Mary Whiton Calkins (1863-1930) 57
  • Mamie Phipps Clark (1917-1983) 66
  • Florence L. Denmark (1931- ) 75
  • Else Frenkel-Brunswik (1908-1958) 88
  • Anna Freud (1895-1982) 96
  • Eleanor Jack Gibson (1910- ) 104
  • Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972) 117
  • Florence Laura Goodenough (1886-1959) 125
  • Jacqueline Jarrett Goodnow (1924- ) 134
  • Edna Heidbreder (1890-1985) 143
  • Ravenna Helson (1925- ) 151
  • Mary Henle (1913- ) 161
  • Leta Stetter Hollingworth (1886-1939) 173
  • Karen Horney (1885-1952) 184
  • BÄrbel Inhelder (1913- ) 197
  • Marie Jahoda (1907- ) 207
  • Christine Ladd-Franklin (1847-1930) 220
  • Eleanor Emmons Maccoby (1917- ) 230
  • Clara Mayo (1931-1981) 238
  • Maria Montessori (1870-1952) 246
  • Bernice L. Neugarten (1916- ) 256
  • Carolyn Robertson Payton (1925- ) 266
  • Pauline (pat) Snedden Sears (1908- ) 275
  • Virginia Staudt Sexton (1916- ) 285
  • Carolyn Wood Sherif (1922-1982) 297
  • Janet Taylor Spence (1923- ) 307
  • Bonnie Ruth Strickland (1936- ) 317
  • Thelma Gwinn Thurstone (1897- ) 327
  • Leona E. Tyler (1906- ) 335
  • Margaret Floy Washburn (1871-1939) 342
  • Beth Lucy Wellman (1895-1952) 350
  • Part III Awards and Recognition 359
  • Selected Award-Winning Contributions 361
  • Part IV Bibliographic Resources 379
  • Women in Psychology: Bibliographic Resources 381
  • Part V Appendices 399
  • Appendix A - A Chronology of Birth Years 401
  • Appendix B - Places of Birth 403
  • Appendix C - Major Fields 405
  • Index 409
  • About the Contributors 435
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