Women in Psychology: A Bio-Bibliographic Sourcebook

By Agnes N. O'Connell; Nancy Felipe Russo | Go to book overview

JACQUELINE JARRETT GOODNOW (1924- )

Richard D. Walk

Jacqueline Jarrett Goodnow has had a long and distinguished career as a cognitive and developmental psychologist. She began her cognitive studies at Radcliffe with a dissertation on adult two-choice learning that sparked collaborative research that resulted in the classic A Study of Thinking ( Bruner, Goodnow, & Austin, 1956). Thus, early in her career she helped change the course of psychology toward the study of cognitive science.

She was also a pioneer in the study of the influence of culture on thinking with her monograph on the use of Piagetian tasks with schooled and unschooled children in Hong Kong ( Goodnow, 1962). At George Washington University she studied intersensory topics with children and began her studies of children's drawings viewed as cognitive, problem-solving productions, resulting in the influential book Children Drawing ( Goodnow, 1977). At Macquarie University she continued studies with children and broadened her interest in children to topics of social policy. This is represented in the books Children and Families in Australia: Contemporary Issues and Problems ( Burns & Goodnow, 1979), Home and School: A Child's Eye View ( Goodnow & Burns, 1985), and Women, Social Science and Public Policy ( Goodnow & Pateman, 1985).

Jacqueline Goodnow's career has been devoted to an understanding of cognitive processes, of thinking in a broad sense, with a focus on children. Recipient of the 1989 G. Stanley Hall Award of the American Psychological Association's Division on Developmental Psychology, she is internationally known as a developmental psychologist who focuses on cognition, pushing to understand "the links between schemas and actions" ( Goodnow, 1988b).


FAMILY BACKGROUND AND EDUCATION

Jacqueline Jarrett Goodnow was born November 25, 1924, in Toowoomba, a middle-sized town about fifty miles west of Brisbane, in Queensland, Australia. Her parents were George Bellingen Jarrett and Florence Bickley Jarrett. The second oldest of six children, she is a fifth-generation Australian with "convict"

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Women in Psychology: A Bio-Bibliographic Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part I Overview 1
  • Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 3
  • Part II the Women and Their Contributions 11
  • Anne Anastasi (1908- ) 13
  • Nancy Bayley (1899- ) 23
  • Sandra Lipsitz Bem (1944- ) 30
  • Jeanne Humphrey Block (1923-1981) 40
  • Charlotte M. BÜhler (1893-1974) 49
  • Mary Whiton Calkins (1863-1930) 57
  • Mamie Phipps Clark (1917-1983) 66
  • Florence L. Denmark (1931- ) 75
  • Else Frenkel-Brunswik (1908-1958) 88
  • Anna Freud (1895-1982) 96
  • Eleanor Jack Gibson (1910- ) 104
  • Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972) 117
  • Florence Laura Goodenough (1886-1959) 125
  • Jacqueline Jarrett Goodnow (1924- ) 134
  • Edna Heidbreder (1890-1985) 143
  • Ravenna Helson (1925- ) 151
  • Mary Henle (1913- ) 161
  • Leta Stetter Hollingworth (1886-1939) 173
  • Karen Horney (1885-1952) 184
  • BÄrbel Inhelder (1913- ) 197
  • Marie Jahoda (1907- ) 207
  • Christine Ladd-Franklin (1847-1930) 220
  • Eleanor Emmons Maccoby (1917- ) 230
  • Clara Mayo (1931-1981) 238
  • Maria Montessori (1870-1952) 246
  • Bernice L. Neugarten (1916- ) 256
  • Carolyn Robertson Payton (1925- ) 266
  • Pauline (pat) Snedden Sears (1908- ) 275
  • Virginia Staudt Sexton (1916- ) 285
  • Carolyn Wood Sherif (1922-1982) 297
  • Janet Taylor Spence (1923- ) 307
  • Bonnie Ruth Strickland (1936- ) 317
  • Thelma Gwinn Thurstone (1897- ) 327
  • Leona E. Tyler (1906- ) 335
  • Margaret Floy Washburn (1871-1939) 342
  • Beth Lucy Wellman (1895-1952) 350
  • Part III Awards and Recognition 359
  • Selected Award-Winning Contributions 361
  • Part IV Bibliographic Resources 379
  • Women in Psychology: Bibliographic Resources 381
  • Part V Appendices 399
  • Appendix A - A Chronology of Birth Years 401
  • Appendix B - Places of Birth 403
  • Appendix C - Major Fields 405
  • Index 409
  • About the Contributors 435
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