Women in Psychology: A Bio-Bibliographic Sourcebook

By Agnes N. O'Connell; Nancy Felipe Russo | Go to book overview

CHRISTINE LADD-FRANKLIN (1847-1930)

Thomas C. Cadwalladerand Joyce V. Cadwallader

Christine Ladd-Franklin was the pioneer American woman psychologist, logician, and mathematician. After graduating from Vassar College in 1869, she taught science and mathematics at the secondary level until 1878, when she began graduate work in mathematics at Johns Hopkins University. She earned a Ph.D. in logic and mathematics by 1882, but the degree was not granted until 1926. In 1892 she formulated the Ladd-Franklin color-sensation theory, which almost a century later is still cited. She was the coeditor of the important Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology ( 1901- 1905). She was a part-time lecturer at Johns Hopkins University from 1904 to 1909 and at Columbia University from 1915 until her death. Ladd-Franklin published on logic, psychology of vision, and on women's and other issues throughout her entire adult life. Among her honors are an 1887 Vassar College LL.D. degree and a ranking as one of the fifty most important psychologists in the first American Men of Science in 1906.


FAMILY BACKGROUND AND EARLY EDUCATION

Christine Ladd was born December 1, 1847, to Eliphalet Ladd, a merchant, and Augusta Niles Ladd at Windsor, Connecticut. In 1853 the family returned to Windsor after some years in New York City. Following her mother's death in 1860, her father remarried in 1862. From about then Ladd lived with her paternal grandmother in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. She had a brother, Henry (born 1850); a sister, Jane Augusta Ladd McCordia (born 1854); a half-sister, Katharine (born 1865); and a half-brother, George (born 1867). Ladd was a distant relative of the psychologist George Trumbull Ladd ( 1842- 1921); their common ancestor died in 1693.

Ladd graduated from the coeducational Welshing Academy in Wilbraham, Massachusetts, in 1865 as valedictorian. She entered Vassar College in 1866, but due to a shortage of funds she withdrew at the end of the year. She taught public school during part of the 1867-68 year; and with aid from an aunt, she

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Women in Psychology: A Bio-Bibliographic Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part I Overview 1
  • Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 3
  • Part II the Women and Their Contributions 11
  • Anne Anastasi (1908- ) 13
  • Nancy Bayley (1899- ) 23
  • Sandra Lipsitz Bem (1944- ) 30
  • Jeanne Humphrey Block (1923-1981) 40
  • Charlotte M. BÜhler (1893-1974) 49
  • Mary Whiton Calkins (1863-1930) 57
  • Mamie Phipps Clark (1917-1983) 66
  • Florence L. Denmark (1931- ) 75
  • Else Frenkel-Brunswik (1908-1958) 88
  • Anna Freud (1895-1982) 96
  • Eleanor Jack Gibson (1910- ) 104
  • Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972) 117
  • Florence Laura Goodenough (1886-1959) 125
  • Jacqueline Jarrett Goodnow (1924- ) 134
  • Edna Heidbreder (1890-1985) 143
  • Ravenna Helson (1925- ) 151
  • Mary Henle (1913- ) 161
  • Leta Stetter Hollingworth (1886-1939) 173
  • Karen Horney (1885-1952) 184
  • BÄrbel Inhelder (1913- ) 197
  • Marie Jahoda (1907- ) 207
  • Christine Ladd-Franklin (1847-1930) 220
  • Eleanor Emmons Maccoby (1917- ) 230
  • Clara Mayo (1931-1981) 238
  • Maria Montessori (1870-1952) 246
  • Bernice L. Neugarten (1916- ) 256
  • Carolyn Robertson Payton (1925- ) 266
  • Pauline (pat) Snedden Sears (1908- ) 275
  • Virginia Staudt Sexton (1916- ) 285
  • Carolyn Wood Sherif (1922-1982) 297
  • Janet Taylor Spence (1923- ) 307
  • Bonnie Ruth Strickland (1936- ) 317
  • Thelma Gwinn Thurstone (1897- ) 327
  • Leona E. Tyler (1906- ) 335
  • Margaret Floy Washburn (1871-1939) 342
  • Beth Lucy Wellman (1895-1952) 350
  • Part III Awards and Recognition 359
  • Selected Award-Winning Contributions 361
  • Part IV Bibliographic Resources 379
  • Women in Psychology: Bibliographic Resources 381
  • Part V Appendices 399
  • Appendix A - A Chronology of Birth Years 401
  • Appendix B - Places of Birth 403
  • Appendix C - Major Fields 405
  • Index 409
  • About the Contributors 435
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