The Later Crusades, 1274-1580: From Lyons to Alcazar

By Norman Housley | Go to book overview

5
Latin Rule in Greece and the Aegean 1274-1580

THE conquest of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204 led to the creation of an intricate tissue of Latin states in Romania, and it is their later fortunes which form the subject of this chapter (see map 6). The most prestigious of the creations, the Latin Empire of Constantinople, was also the weakest. Surrounded by enemies, and failing, despite their strenuous efforts, to attract the settlers they needed for long-term viability, the Empire's rulers staggered from crisis to crisis while searching in vain for a western protector. The coup de grâce, Michael VIII's reconquest of Constantinople in 1261, completed the shift in western interests towards the southern and western part of Romania which had begun with the collapse of the ephemeral 'Kingdom of Thessalonica' in 1224; military aid from Latin Christendom could be dispatched more rapidly towards southern Greece, and the Venetians could deploy their naval superiority with greater effectiveness there and in the Aegean and Adriatic islands. The most important of the surviving states were the Principality of Achaea, which occupied the classical Peloponnese (or Morea, as both Franks and Greeks termed it), and the Duchy of Athens. The Peloponnese was overrun by William of Champlitte and Geoffrey of Villehardouin in 1204-5, and ruled by Geoffrey's descendants. Athens was conquered by Boniface of Montferrat in 1204 and consigned as a fief to the Burgundian lord Odo of la Roche. Odo and the dynasty which he established came to govern Attica, Boeotia, and the Argolid. Seventeen islands in the Cyclades were seized in 1207 with comparative ease by a group of Venetian entrepreneurs led by Mark Sanudo, who partitioned the islands as fiefs amongst his followers, retaining Naxos and several other islands for himself, and ruling with the title Duke of the Archipelago.

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Later Crusades, 1274-1580: From Lyons to Alcazar
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 528

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.